PDA

View Full Version : How Difficult Is It To Get Admitted?



AgActual
11-19-2009, 06:05 PM
I recently applied to National University of Health Sciences and while I wait for word on whether I am accepted or not, I have been trying to find some admissions rates for this university and really every chiropractic school. So far I have turned up nothing. I can't find any school's admissions rates.

Now I know that people tend to say getting into chiropractic school is easy, at least when compared to med school, but exactly how difficult is it to get accepted to a chiropractic school? And please, none of this "oh your dog could get in" stuff.

Let me throw my stats out there.

B.S. in psychology

3.48 undergrad GPA

my two "character references" are from people that i have done volunteer work with

Realistically, does that sound good?

maximillian genossa
11-20-2009, 09:03 AM
You got your Biol, Gen. Chem, Organics and Physics? If so, I do not forsee a major problem.




I recently applied to National University of Health Sciences and while I wait for word on whether I am accepted or not, I have been trying to find some admissions rates for this university and really every chiropractic school. So far I have turned up nothing. I can't find any school's admissions rates.

Now I know that people tend to say getting into chiropractic school is easy, at least when compared to med school, but exactly how difficult is it to get accepted to a chiropractic school? And please, none of this "oh your dog could get in" stuff.

Let me throw my stats out there.

B.S. in psychology

3.48 undergrad GPA

my two "character references" are from people that i have done volunteer work with

Realistically, does that sound good?

AgActual
11-20-2009, 01:05 PM
You got your Biol, Gen. Chem, Organics and Physics? If so, I do not forsee a major problem.

Well there are 3 courses that I am missing and would have to get out of the way before next fall. I have 2 chemistry courses and one physics course that I haven't done yet. Then again my experience with grad schools has shown that they don't care if you have a few courses outstanding, just as long as they are done before you start the program.

maximillian genossa
11-21-2009, 01:15 PM
Well, in Chiro school they use their admissions criteria based on the State's licensing requirements. Example, Parker College in Dallas, Texas will require you to take 8 hrs inorg.chem, 8 hrs org chem and 8 hrs physics because the state requires them as well. They won't admit you in that school without those. Check their requirements carefully.





Well there are 3 courses that I am missing and would have to get out of the way before next fall. I have 2 chemistry courses and one physics course that I haven't done yet. Then again my experience with grad schools has shown that they don't care if you have a few courses outstanding, just as long as they are done before you start the program.

AgActual
11-21-2009, 02:40 PM
Well, in Chiro school they use their admissions criteria based on the State's licensing requirements. Example, Parker College in Dallas, Texas will require you to take 8 hrs inorg.chem, 8 hrs org chem and 8 hrs physics because the state requires them as well. They won't admit you in that school without those. Check their requirements carefully.

Right but this school does have their program where you are admitted provisionally and then finish up any outstanding pre-reqs before you start taking the chiro classes.

maximillian genossa
11-23-2009, 04:56 PM
Cheers then!:clapover:



Right but this school does have their program where you are admitted provisionally and then finish up any outstanding pre-reqs before you start taking the chiro classes.

khiro
11-24-2009, 02:06 PM
i don't know where you could find published admission stats from any chiro college, but you certainly could or should be able to call the admission office of any school and ask for the admission stats of the last entering class. that information should be given straight up, but i would imagine it might be too hard for most employees to think it would be important. most would say, do the pre-reqs, no grade less than a C, average gpa of C+, and bring us a good check. it is a well known fact that all of the schools have empty desks. the enrollment is down somewhere in the neighborhood of 30 - 50% across most of the schools since their hay-days of the late 80s. the flip side to that is almost all of the schools have upgraded their facilities tremendously since that same time period. the students today have much nicer facilities than when i went through. you can read my posts...i am not excited about the future of chiro as far as a vocation/profession. please take a vacation, grab a 6-pack and think long and hard about joining the profession of chiropractic. after that, if you still want to do it, then good luck to you.

khiro

AgActual
11-25-2009, 12:41 PM
Well I did get in. It took them about 2 weeks less to get a decision in than my adviser thought, so I guess this thread was a little unnecessary. Hopefully this will all work out

lbm
12-06-2009, 02:26 PM
Check out dyc.edu

Chiropractic Program Requirements

There are two entry tracks into the chiropractic program. One is the seven-year, two-degree doctor of chiropractic program, where the first degree is a bachelor of science in biology. The other track is simply admittance directly into the professional doctor of chiropractic program after pre-entry requirements have been achieved. The pre-entry requirements include 90 semester credit hours, of which 48 semester credit hours are:


English Language — 6 semester hours
Psychology — 3 semester hours
Social Sciences or Humanities — 15 semester hours
Biological Sciences — 6 semester hours
General or Inorganic Chemistry — 6 semester hours
Organic Chemistry — 6 semester hours
Physics — 6 semester hours
Laboratory sections associated with biology, chemistry and physics courses are also required.

SPODAT
12-18-2009, 10:21 AM
AgActual,
As Khiro said...before you commit, reconsider Chiropractic as a profession. I am only posting here because I've been there. It's really difficult, unless you are in a certain state that has decent insurance reimbursement (all of which are gradually dissapearing), or are interested in a large volume, philosophy based practice. If you are interested in providing chiropractic for people with pain and physical dysfunction, you are likely going to work long and hard and make little money. If you’re generally interested in being a physician, and your science GPA ends up near or above 3.0, consider applying to med school, there are excellent, real Caribbean med schools such as Ross, St. George's (very competitive), SABA, AUC, MUA-Nevis, that are all excellent schools who have many doctors in practice in the United States currently. You can find their forums on ValueMD. I was a long-term chiro, and re-entered a Caribbean medical school and am now applying for residency in the U.S. Yes, it's been hard, but worth it. Just consider it.

khiro
12-18-2009, 05:21 PM
SPODAT isn't typing to exercise his fingers. if you have the grades and motivation, please try medicine. if you don't have the grades, do not make the mistake of thinking that chiropractic is a equal substitute for medicine. it is not. yes, it is true that after you get through with your chiro ed your momma can tell everyone that her son or daughter is a "doctor". it will mean a lot to her to say that, but it doesn't mean anything to most insurance companies, the federal gov't or most of the population. the bottom line is: you need to get paid for what you do, the education that you have, and the investment you have made in yourself to help others. reimbursement is a hot item in medicare, and all private insurance these days. in all of my time in practice (22 yrs now), it has never been this bad. the insurance companies all have in place now ways to NOT pay a claim, or at the very least delay payment (they routinely lose claims; yes, even the electronic ones). it is a sham. the way things are going, i wonder why anyone would even go into medicine (and certainly not chiro).

AgActual
12-21-2009, 01:29 AM
Deleted because I was an *** in the original post.

khiro
12-21-2009, 02:20 PM
i was just giving you my thoughts, and i am sorry that for some reason you became defensive. you see, my thoughts are based on my experience and i would not want you to see only one side of anything. my side is one of caution and not a lot of optimism. but there is another side as well. and there are in the big world of chiropractic, very successful dcs. if you are willing to do the things to be successful in chiropractic (i may be wrong here, i am assuming you want to be successful as defined by numbers of pts AND a steady generous income. your definition may be to be poor, only have the basics of life but still impact people in a positive way (mother theresa) you can accomplish a lot and have personal satisfaction in what you are doing while doing chiropractic. i tell my children to discover their passion by experiencing different activities. "dreams" is a word that could be interpreted as vague or wonderland like. on the other hand, passion is straight from the heart. it is what gets you up in the morning, and allows you to function at 3 a.m. while the rest of the world is dreaming. if you have done your homework on the profession of chiropractic, and you believe that it can give back to you more than what you put in to it, then you don't need to listen to my thoughts on the subject of which profession does more for its members. as my dad used to say, "its your little red wagon, you pull it."

whatever wagon you choose i wish you the best.

SPODAT
12-22-2009, 10:28 PM
I didn't make any assesment of your personal likelihood of failure, but just that the chiropractic profession is not even remotely like what it was 10 years ago, which is the experience base that I beleive most current chiropractic matriculants are deciding upon. So, of course, with enough passion you can do many things. Good luck.

FutureCTMD
12-24-2009, 10:45 AM
Have you considered a DO? If you do well you can then do a residency in FP/NMM and manipulate as well as have privileges and better pay.

SPODAT
12-24-2009, 12:01 PM
that's a really good idea, if a person wants to manipulate. Still respecting you AG and your sense of mission, dont' know your age, but it's very common during the 4 years of chiro or medical education for our desires and passions to change a little. A D.O. who is a very strong manipulator could be a serious assett, and you have so much flexibility to go in many directions.

AgActual
12-25-2009, 01:37 PM
SPODAT and khiro, no worries. I was in a bit of a bad mood the other night. That day I spent nearly two hours at the dentist having a root canal, over drafted twice on my bank account, and my girlfriend got into a car accident (she's ok). I was a bit....frustrated. Usually I am far more mellow and mature than that. My apologies.

As for the issue at hand, don't worry, I do know that risks of being a chiropractor. I know there is a higher chance of failure when compared to other health care fields, that there is a higher loan default rate, and there is less prestige than being an MD. I have been researching the pro and cons for years. I know many get into this field because they couldn't get into another health care field or they think that the money is good for everyone or they want to call themselves "doctor"; maybe they just go into this blindly without realizing the downsides. However, I believe that I have a well researched and thought out plan.

I'm not like some of these chiro students that are 20 or 21, and think it would be cool to be a doctor. I am in my mid-20's, have a bachelors, and have spent time in grad school for psychology. I actually had a 4.0 when I left. I think I do have a pretty good perspective on what is to come. I don't want to bore anyone with the details as to how I came about this decision but I can assure you that I am not flying blind, and I do feel that this is the perfect choice for me.

As to going into osteopathic program, that's not really what I want to do. I do believe in medicine, unlike some chiropractors out there, but its not for me. Perhaps you are all right, in a few years I could be thinking "god, why didn't i become a DO instead?" but from where I am standing right now, it seems very unappealing. There are just too many aspects of such a career that I do not have any interest in.

SPODAT
12-25-2009, 02:40 PM
AG,
No problem. Hope you enjoy your career.

khiro
12-28-2009, 09:08 AM
its no problem AG. i think he and i agree that looking back we when first started our practices that todays practice is no where as rewarding (both mentally and financially). some of that has to do with things that i could do better at; some of it i have no control over at all. and it is the latter that is particularly frustrating. chiro has been very rewarding to me. it has taken me to almost the point of retirement (i am close to 50), with all of the perks of a high salary. but you have to look forward, and for me it is disappointing to see the kind of practice that i have today remembering the practice that i had 10 yrs back. now all industries get stale, and you have to keep evolving. i read where one chiro in columbus ohio had to "retool", so he went the way of massage/spa/chiro. chiro was less than 50% of his work. i guess that i am tired of evolving so it is time to go to the house. best of luck to you.

Phospholipid
12-28-2009, 09:30 AM
Well I don't want to be an MD. I certainly have the grade for it and this may be shocking to hear, not everyone wants to be a medical doctor. Despite what some might be implying, I am not going into chiropractic because I am a failure and just want a title or to make mama proud. I have my reasons for perusing this career and I am not sure why I need to justify it.

But thanks for telling me that i am destined to fail. Perhaps I should stop eating too. Hell, I'm going to die someday anyway. What's the point?

You know what, you two anonymous people on the internet that I have never met are correct. Following my dreams is a dumb idea. Nothing is worth doing if there is a chance of failure. Thank you both. Now if you excuse me, I am going to crawl into bed and wait for sweet death to come.
.................. Not only is there less prestige than an MD, ITS NOT EVEN COMPARABLE. its like comparing an MD to a part time job as a cashier. A chiropractor is as much a doctor as your local grocery ******.
You know why you couldn't find any admission stats for any chiropractor school? Because it would be horrendous and embarrasing for schools to post it. How does around 2.0 average GPA sound? and maybe a 98% acceptance rate sound?......... You just need a pulse nad approved for loans for them to accept you. They need students tuition to keep going, and they don't care if you succeed or not. You have been warned... if you keep going, this will be the worst decision you have made in your life. You are better off working at home depot for $12/hr for the rest of your life than go to chiropractor school........
Career Changer? Think Chiropractic. (http://www.saycampuslife.com/2009/01/21/career-changer-think-chiropractic/)

AgActual
12-28-2009, 01:12 PM
Really this is true of any health care field. Things have changed across the board. In clinical psychology, for example, 15 years ago, the average salary was about $150,000 (in today's dollars) and the hours were tolerable. Now, the average clinical psychologist makes about $65,000-$75,000 and works 50-60 hours per week. On top of that, several specialties with in the field, such as clinical neruopsychology, are more or less dead. Their problem is that they tried to fight psychiatrists in the early 1990's and failed, now they are being squeezed out by the psychiatrists much more powerful political army.

Medical doctors also have problems with NP's moving into their territory. And overall, insurance companies have been lowering reimbursement rates.

I think the problem is with the overall system and not just with chiropractic. It isn't much prettier anywhere else.


its no problem AG. i think he and i agree that looking back we when first started our practices that todays practice is no where as rewarding (both mentally and financially). some of that has to do with things that i could do better at; some of it i have no control over at all. and it is the latter that is particularly frustrating. chiro has been very rewarding to me. it has taken me to almost the point of retirement (i am close to 50), with all of the perks of a high salary. but you have to look forward, and for me it is disappointing to see the kind of practice that i have today remembering the practice that i had 10 yrs back. now all industries get stale, and you have to keep evolving. i read where one chiro in columbus ohio had to "retool", so he went the way of massage/spa/chiro. chiro was less than 50% of his work. i guess that i am tired of evolving so it is time to go to the house. best of luck to you.

SPODAT
12-29-2009, 03:32 PM
its no problem AG. i think he and i agree that looking back we when first started our practices that todays practice is no where as rewarding (both mentally and financially). some of that has to do with things that i could do better at; some of it i have no control over at all. and it is the latter that is particularly frustrating. chiro has been very rewarding to me. it has taken me to almost the point of retirement (i am close to 50), with all of the perks of a high salary. but you have to look forward, and for me it is disappointing to see the kind of practice that i have today remembering the practice that i had 10 yrs back. now all industries get stale, and you have to keep evolving. i read where one chiro in columbus ohio had to "retool", so he went the way of massage/spa/chiro. chiro was less than 50% of his work. i guess that i am tired of evolving so it is time to go to the house. best of luck to you.

Could not possibly have said it better. Tired of evolving is an excellent way to put it. I died :peace:. But that's not for everyone, as mentioned, I truley hope you do fantastically AG.

SPODAT
12-29-2009, 03:35 PM
Really this is true of any health care field. Things have changed across the board. In clinical psychology, for example, 15 years ago, the average salary was about $150,000 (in today's dollars) and the hours were tolerable. Now, the average clinical psychologist makes about $65,000-$75,000 and works 50-60 hours per week. On top of that, several specialties with in the field, such as clinical neruopsychology, are more or less dead. Their problem is that they tried to fight psychiatrists in the early 1990's and failed, now they are being squeezed out by the psychiatrists much more powerful political army.

Medical doctors also have problems with NP's moving into their territory. And overall, insurance companies have been lowering reimbursement rates.

I think the problem is with the overall system and not just with chiropractic. It isn't much prettier anywhere else.

Yes, this is very true AG, I think that medicine, since it is the dominant healt care provider, and will continue to grow in dominance, regarding reimbursement that is (saying nothing about quality of care lacking in Chiropractic)... hence the necessity to be more creative and better at "patient education". (regarding which, most seminar teachers are really teaching patient coercion or brainwashing).







Copyright © 2003-2018 ValueMD, LLC. All rights reserved.