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Michael W.W.
04-20-2004, 12:07 AM
Hi,

I am from Alberta, Canada and have been accepted into a 5 year med program at University College Dublin in Ireland. I was wondering if there are any Canadians who are currently going to this school or who have recently graduated from it. I have a few general questions.

How hard is it to secure an H1-B visa in a non-competitve residency in the US? Have there ever been any Canadian grads who have not been able to get a residency on an H1-B visa from this med school.

Any help would really be appreciated. I am worried about making such a financial commitment without speaking to some UCD students or graduates.

Mike

r_stringer
04-20-2004, 12:55 PM
Hi there,

If you are going to med school in Ireland why do you want to do a residency in the US? I would finish my residency in Ireland since Canada completely recognizes UK and Ireland residencies. In that way you can come back to Canada and practise unless of course you want be working in the US.

Rob

Miklos
04-21-2004, 01:30 AM
Hi there,

If you are going to med school in Ireland why do you want to do a residency in the US? I would finish my residency in Ireland since Canada completely recognizes UK and Ireland residencies. In that way you can come back to Canada and practise unless of course you want be working in the US.

Rob

My $0.02

Residency is much shorter in the US (as well as Canada, depending on the province) AND you become a specialist after completing it and your specialty exam. No guarantees of becoming a consultant in UK/Ireland. (Never mind visa/work permit issues).

r_stringer
04-21-2004, 06:39 PM
Miklos,

It is true that US residencies are shorter than UK/Ireland counterparts, but that is exactly the reason why canada does not completely recognizes them . Canadian residencies are usually longer with the exception of FP.
So one will be required to make up that extra year in canda and we all know how tough that is. If anyone is determined to practise in Canada, UK/Ireland residencies are a much better option. The Royal College of physicans and surgeons publishes a list of countires and programs they approve of see the URL below:

http://rcpsc.medical.org/residency/certification/img_e.php

Rob

Miklos
04-22-2004, 03:43 AM
Miklos,

It is true that US residencies are shorter than UK/Ireland counterparts, but that is exactly the reason why canada does not completely recognizes them . Canadian residencies are usually longer with the exception of FP.
So one will be required to make up that extra year in canda and we all know how tough that is. If anyone is determined to practise in Canada, UK/Ireland residencies are a much better option. The Royal College of physicans and surgeons publishes a list of countires and programs they approve of see the URL below:

http://rcpsc.medical.org/residency/certification/img_e.php

Rob

Rob,

Good link, good point.

I pulled the Psych requirements.


3. The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) have created a reciprocity agreement that accepts the credentials of applicants to each other's examinations. To be eligible to sit the RCPSC Psychiatry examination the applicant must:

Have attained certification by the ABPN in Psychiatry.

Possess an unrestricted license to practiSe medicine in one of the United States or a province of Canada.

If trained in the United States, the applicant must have completed four years in a Psychiatry program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and one year of specialty experience.

Alright, let's compare then.

For someone training in the US to get their specialty accepted in Canada in Psych.

1) Complete 4 years of residency
2) Pass ABPN boards
3) Work one year as a specialist, AT specialist pay!!!!
4) Sit for the RCSPC Psych boards

Total: 4 years of training at resident pay, 1 year at specialist pay, two postgraduate exams.


http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/traindev/career/career.htm[/url]]
How is training organised?
General Training:
During your general training in a medical school - lasting approximately 5-6 years - you could choose an "elective" period in psychiatry (about 3-4 months). You would then carry on working in pre-registration posts (i.e. House Officer posts ) for a period of one year. After this, you become registered with the General Medical Council (GMC). In your post-registration period working as a Senior House Officer, you should try to gain experience recognised by the Royal College of Psychiatrists, such as working in general practice or general medicine.

Basic Specialist Training:

Your basic specialist training in psychiatry takes place on College-approved and recognised Rotational Training Schemes, and lasts three years; you would spend about six months each in as many specialties as are offered by the training scheme - as well fulfilling the basic requirement to train (initially for one year) in general adult and old age psychiatry. You should ensure that your particular area of interest, i.e. psychotherapy or forensic, is covered by your training scheme.
Details of recognised training schemes are available from the College on request. After initial training, and at least one year's experience of general psychiatry, you would be ready to sit for Part I of the College Membership examination - the MRCPsych.
The MRCPsych (Membership) Examination:

The emphasis of the Membership exam is on clinical work:
Part I consists of a Multiple Choice Question (MCQ) Paper and a clinical examination which will be a test of clinical skills in assessment.
Part I must be passed within three years of full-time approved psychiatric training (or equivalent period of part-time training).
Part II consists of a second clinical examination, much broader than the first, two MCQ papers, an Essay Paper and a paper containing questions on basic sciences and clinical topics.

Once you have successfully obtained Part I, you should work as an SHO in rotating specialty posts for a further 2/3 years, after which time you would be eligible to take Part II of the
examination. If you pass, you are awarded the MRCPsych, and become a Member of the College. To summarise, to obtain the MRCPsych, you would need:
a minimum of one year's 1psychiatric experience before taking the Part I
two to three years' further training before taking the Part II (although this period can be shorter if you have other training that is recognised by the College), such as general practice medicine, general medicine, etc. Full details are available on request from the Examinations Department of the College.
Higher Specialist Training:

Higher specialist training entails working as a Specialist Registrar or Lecturer for a further three/four years. During higher specialist training, there is an opportunity to work in general adult psychiatry, or you can opt for one of the specialities as listed above, with a special interest in another sub-specialty such as forensic or liaison psychiatry. After completion of higher specialist training, you could apply for posts such as Senior Lecturer, Consultant or Professor of Psychiatry.


Ok, if I read this right:

2 years postgraduate (or more) prior to starting Psych training.
3 years of Basic Psychiatry training, prior to exams
3/4 years of SpR training prior to becoming a consultant

Total: A total of 8/9 years prior to becoming a consultant (subspecialized), which is not guaranteed.

Miklos







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