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Communications Officer
06-11-2008, 11:31 AM
In the coming months, I would like to take the occasional opportunity to clarify on ValueMD the nature and operation of IUHS. This is worth doing because the information communicated about IUHS on ValueMD is often inaccurate. Like other medical schools, the undergraduate curriculum of IUHS has a preclinical component and a clinical clerkship component. The preclinical component is made up of 10 blocks. The first 8 blocks are taught online. Block 9 is taught live on St. Kitts (one month – an introduction to clinical skills in medicine) and online for the remainder of this Block. Block 10 is an online review block preparatory to students taking USMLE Step 1. When students have passed USMLE Step 1, they are then eligible to begin various clinical clerkships in medical facilities (hospitals and physicians’ offices) which are like clerkships sponsored by other medical schools. Only the preclinical (basic medical science) experience is an online exercise, the clinical education occurs in live clinical settings.
Block 1 is an introduction to preclinical studies, and the 7 blocks that follow are organized by organ systems. Each week in first 8 blocks has a Case of the Week (CoW) that sets the tone for the week with some of the lectures relating directly to the CoW while other lectures on the organ systems discussed have a looser association with the CoW. The lectures are given in a broadcast format, where the faculty member accesses a server program through his/her computer/internet and students access the server programs through their computers/internet. The students see and hear the lecturer, see simultaneous PowerPoint presentations, and can communicate in real time with the lecturer (and other students) by a chat room. The lecturer can read comments and questions in the chat room and speak to these comments/questions during the lecture when appropriate. Students are also encouraged to email the lecturer using regular emails.
While this mode of lecturing is a type of distance learning, which many medical schools are working hard to establish, the communication is easier between the lecturer and the student than in the classical lecture hall environment, in that the student has direct and immediate access to the lecturer. Also, IUHS maintains an archive of the broadcasts that the students can access (students are encouraged to attend the live broadcast, so that they can get quick answers to questions that they may have). Students also have access to the lecturers’ PowerPoint files prior to the broadcasts, so that they can see the material prior to the broadcast.
The unique feature of this broadcast system is that there is no physical lecture hall. On this point there are differences of opinion. Some would say that the gathering of students into one room or a number of rooms (as is typical of most distance learning programs) is an important characteristic of higher learning. In our broadcast environment, the students can ‘chat’ with each other, so what is missing is only physical proximity (‘intellectual proximity’ is preserved). All are aware of the pros and cons of the lecture hall environment, so I will not discuss this aspect.
In conclusion, IUHS has developed a medical curriculum that allows students to pursue their preclinical medical studies in their home or workplace without giving up (but advisedly reducing) their ‘day job’. In these days of dwindling loans, this option may allow individuals (who would not otherwise be able to do so) to achieve their goal of becoming doctors. The clinical program is 100% live. IUHS is working hard to provide online material to back up, but never replace, the live clinical experience.
I welcome questions and comments from the ValueMD community regarding the current operation of IUHS.

zarkosy
06-11-2008, 04:40 PM
I think potential students on these forums are worried about licensing problems that IUHS graduates will face in the future. You may have good education or mode of delivery in your case but the opposition that people have, probably due to misinformation or ignorance about your program in general, is the absence of physical labs for anatomy. It would be in your interest to perhaps post a few examples on your website of how you would achieve the goals of the anatomy course without physical lab attendance. People will at least be able to judge for themselves.

You do have graduates in residencies and in practice without problems. So it probably is a legitmate program. But you have a long way to go to convince medical boards, which are turning against IUHS and in fact ALL Caribbean schools except the top 3 as evident from the recent decision by Arkansas medical board to follow the CA approved medical schools list. If a small state like Arkansas has adapted the CA list, think about the other bigger states and what they will do.

This has mainly resulted due to the bashing of Carib graduates from Carib graduates themselves and the various schools' agents about other schools as it often happens on this forum and others. I personally know someone who works for the GA medical board who told me that all 50 states would eventually adapt the CA list thus blocking out all the Carib schools for licensure except the top 3-4. Apparently they are simply sick of getting emails and phone calls from various Carib school students or agents bashing each other. So they are going to chose the easy way by just adopting the CA list soon. When that happens, all the Carib grads except SGU, Ross, AUC and SABA may come to this site and bash the medical boards and each other!

As you know already, GA is now not going to license IUHS graduates and some other Carib schools. For the time being, until all 50 states adapt the CA list, IUHS would do itself a favor by honestly answering the licensing questions on your website. Your website needs a long overdue makeover too so perhaps you can put all the new information along with the new website.

lswiltshire
06-11-2008, 07:53 PM
I hope to God that all 50 states will adapt the CA list—and very soon.

It is music to hear that Arkansas is following the Ca list and that Georgia will soon do the same. It has taken five years.

When that happens, all the Carib grads except SGU, Ross, AUC and SABA may come to this site and bash the medical boards and each other!

It wont matter then, but that kind of bashing will be great fun! I gave up writing-- but I must start back writing again. Thanks for telling me that such letters are actually now bearing fruit.

IUHS is NOT the only school that do not have physical labs for anatomy. Personally, I believe that you can get around that by the teaching aids that we have today.

The post by IUHS today is as accurate and as honest as can be.

Communications Officer
06-11-2008, 08:06 PM
Zarkosy makes a number of excellent points.
The first is IUHS should have some accessible areas for examples on the IUHS website that allows those without user IDs and passwords to gain access. I will float this past our administrators. I am personally in favour of such an approach not only for perspective students, but also for administrators of clinical clerkship programs. I assume the main worry will be security of our website, but it is worth looking into this possibility. Thanks for the suggestion
The question about anatomy labs is a complicated one. The most important one for students and administrators is the demands of licensing bodies, and this must be taken very seriously. But there is another side that deals with curriculum development and academic logic. I went through a medical school with labs in every course; there were more labs than lectures. I loved this lab-based education; it made me a good medical scientist, but I doubt whether the lab-based education was that important in making me a good doctor. Being a good doctor was helped more by having good clinical mentors at the bedside, which for my medical school began in the second of five years (we interned as the fifth year of our medical program). If I had to pick lab exercises that would help me to become a good doctor, I would say surface anatomy of live individuals would be more useful than cadaveric anatomy. Cadaveric anatomy is most useful for those going into surgery and not so useful for the undifferentiated practitioner who spends a lot of time in physical examination (surface anatomy). All other labs have disappeared in many medical schools, so why are cadaveric anatomy labs still retained? I think it is mainly as a rite of passage rather than as a single remaining lab requirement for undergraduate medicine. A number of medical schools in the USA and Canada have become cadaverless either overtly or covertly.
Licensing bodies have as their major concern the protection of the profession. They do not develop medical curricula nor are they concerned primarily with the orderly progression of students through undergraduate and postgraduate medicine. They function to maintain the viability of the medical profession, which is a worthy objective. Licensing bodies will put up hurdles, such as a requirement for cadaveric anatomy, any time that they feel that the hurdles are necessary to protect the medical profession, and they usually justify the hurdles in terms of an intellectual requirement. The intellectual requirement is not the main point and we as consumers (doctors, medical students and patients) should not confuse the motives, but should accept the requirement of licensing bodies to protect the profession as important. Do not bash the medical licensing bodies, educate them.
As a Canadian, I am dismayed that our Canadian licensing boards put so many hurdles in the way of young Canadian men and women that go to Caribbean medical schools so that they find it too difficult to return to Canada. I had thought of the USA as being enlightened in this regard and am saddened to see a retreat in the way that Zarkosy describes. Both of our wealthy countries are stealing doctors from impoverished countries that cannot afford to lose a single doctor. The more our two wealthy countries block Caribbean medical graduates, the more our two countries will have to recruit doctors from poor countries to solve our physician shortfall. We must also educate our political leaders, so that the poor countries will not hate us so much, which they will do if we continue to recruit their doctors.

zarkosy
06-12-2008, 06:41 PM
I hope to God that all 50 states will adapt the CA list—and very soon.
When that happens, all the Carib grads except SGU, Ross, AUC and SABA may come to this site and bash the medical boards and each other!

Actually, CA list is only the beginning and just a transition to a complete block of the Carib schools EXCEPT SGU and UWI. The boards seem to hold only these two schools in highest regard. People apparently from Ross, SABA and AUC themselves have been complaining to ECFMG and medical boards about apparent overcrowding and degrading facilities at those schools. Its beyond me why students from their own school would complain to ECFMG and state boards...why shoot yourself in the foot??? Why not just complain to your own schools??

In fact ECFMG itself is considering changes to its own rules also as a result of pressure from state medical boards to block all carib schools. However, even ECFMG seems to hold SGU and UWI in high regard. I have good contacts in the GA medical board and also someone with inside knowledge of the ECFMG. Although this is apparently only preliminary, there is no doubt that ECFMG is planning to step in to stop all the Carib schools except SGU and UWI. I think Ross, AUC and SABA might still be around for a while but will no doubt die a slow death while SGU and UWI are bound to remain as the only 2 Carib schools that would allow people to become licensed in the US in the future. Once Ross, AUC and SABA are also out, it appears that people who are already licensed will also face hassles at the time of license renewal. It remains to be seen what kind of problems those already in practise would face at the time of renewal or to get an unrestricted license. I could not get much info out of my contact about this.

If you email ECFMG they would only tell you that they may change but will not reveal anything else unless of course you have good insider contacts. It is great fun to watch the Carib schools, their students and graduates self destructing:D

veteran
06-13-2008, 06:50 PM
Actually, CA list is only the beginning and just a transition to a complete block of the Carib schools EXCEPT SGU and UWI. The boards seem to hold only these two schools in highest regard. People apparently from Ross, SABA and AUC themselves have been complaining to ECFMG and medical boards about apparent overcrowding and degrading facilities at those schools. Its beyond me why students from their own school would complain to ECFMG and state boards...why shoot yourself in the foot??? Why not just complain to your own schools??

In fact ECFMG itself is considering changes to its own rules also as a result of pressure from state medical boards to block all carib schools. However, even ECFMG seems to hold SGU and UWI in high regard. I have good contacts in the GA medical board and also someone with inside knowledge of the ECFMG. Although this is apparently only preliminary, there is no doubt that ECFMG is planning to step in to stop all the Carib schools except SGU and UWI. I think Ross, AUC and SABA might still be around for a while but will no doubt die a slow death while SGU and UWI are bound to remain as the only 2 Carib schools that would allow people to become licensed in the US in the future. Once Ross, AUC and SABA are also out, it appears that people who are already licensed will also face hassles at the time of license renewal. It remains to be seen what kind of problems those already in practise would face at the time of renewal or to get an unrestricted license. I could not get much info out of my contact about this.

If you email ECFMG they would only tell you that they may change but will not reveal anything else unless of course you have good insider contacts. It is great fun to watch the Carib schools, their students and graduates self destructing:D


Thanks for the useful info. I am a wounded Iraq veteran looking into this school and Oceania University of Medicine in Samoa. It offers a unique opportunity for people like me. I know some marines who are also going to apply to these schools. Most of us r just interested in workn 4 d VA hospital. So hopefully der wil be at least 1 state dat wil license these grads.

By d way, y wer u banned dude? i thought ur info is very helpful and honest. read ur other posts in IUHS forum too. i thought the other post in this forum by sum1 who seems to want to see all carib schools destroyed has not been banned?!

Communications Officer
06-14-2008, 09:24 AM
Of course, IUHS welcomes veterans, particularly if they served as medics. Our program does have some limited leeway in allowing students to continue their health team work. We recommend taking on reduced responsibilities to allow for sufficient time to study.

Communications Officer
06-14-2008, 01:14 PM
Before we all get in a sweat about the idea of freezing most of the Caribbean medical schools out of licensing, we should remember that such licensing is a state prerogative. It would be extremely unlikely that all states would follow the same licensing pattern. This opportunity for diversity is why countries like the USA and Canada are organized into federal and state (provincial) spheres of responsibility.

mombo
06-14-2008, 01:16 PM
Hello, why is there so much hate for IUHS? Even the moderators of this website seem to hate and thus looks like they keep banning people who post some useful stuff about this school and other caribbean schools.

Why is the poster called lswiltshire something not banned while others, even a veteran for God's sake, has been banned.

Communications Officer
06-14-2008, 01:53 PM
I do not think that it is a question of hate, but of misunderstanding and being suspicious of an organization that looks as if it is doing things differently, like IUHS. Actually, I think that we are doing our best to maintain the standard wisdom of medical teaching. Although our preclinical phase is based on an online communication process, our students also have mentors where they live with which we encourage weekly meetings. We also use proctors for exams. Furthermore, the Cases of the Week (CoW) are discussed in telephone conference calls in which the students meet with a faculty moderator. The students are not isolated, and are given every opportunity to interact with their teachers. Many professors give out their personal emails and phone numbers.

mombo
06-14-2008, 02:11 PM
I do not think that it is a question of hate, but of misunderstanding and being suspicious of an organization that looks as if it is doing things differently, like IUHS. Actually, I think that we are doing our best to maintain the standard wisdom of medical teaching. Although our preclinical phase is based on an online communication process, our students also have mentors where they live with which we encourage weekly meetings. We also use proctors for exams. Furthermore, the Cases of the Week (CoW) are discussed in telephone conference calls in which the students meet with a faculty moderator. The students are not isolated, and are given every opportunity to interact with their teachers. Many professors give out their personal emails and phone numbers.

all this sounds good and is probably true BUT your school is being rejected by state medical boards one by one. how do you plan to communicate with state boards and convince them that you are a legit school because many dont believe that you are legit like CA, AL, AR, NM, GA, CO, TX, KY and IN.

lswiltshire
06-14-2008, 04:35 PM
mombo mombo: you are very naughty!

is why you wanna ban lsw?

dont you think that lsw has a function on VMD?

dont you think that lsw has something worthwhile to add?

note that the so called veteran was banned for having multiple accounts just like zarkosy


mombo I really wish that the other islands would be more serious about medical education like the "big" islands Barbados Trinidad Jamaica & the Bahamas where UWI medical school campuses are located.

I wish we could get the Ministers of Health together on this issue- but the "lower" islands as we call them need the students for thier tourism product. LOL

DOC.p
06-14-2008, 04:49 PM
if people don't follow the Terms of Service, then the moderators intervene. also multiple accounts are against the TOS...if you look in the "location" are of these users, you'll see "multiple accounts" listed - there's the answer to your question.

Scott1981
06-14-2008, 05:33 PM
mombo mombo: you are very naughty!

is why you wanna ban lsw?

dont you think that lsw has a function on VMD?

dont you think that lsw has something worthwhile to add?

note that the so called veteran was banned for having multiple accounts just like zarkosy


mombo I really wish that the other islands would be more serious about medical education like the "big" islands Barbados Trinidad Jamaica & the Bahamas where UWI medical school campuses are located.

I wish we could get the Ministers of Health together on this issue- but the "lower" islands as we call them need the students for thier tourism product. LOL

there is a UWI medical campus in bahamas? are you sure.... i never heard of any medical school in the bahamas?

lswiltshire
06-14-2008, 08:08 PM
Teaching hospital in Bahamas for purposes of doing the internship period.

lifeAgift
06-22-2008, 11:16 AM
IUHS model sounds very similiar to an apprenticeship model of learning. Which is the approach midwives and physicians use to take decades/centuries ago. Actually in many countries midwives still follow this model.

DrFraud
06-22-2008, 11:27 AM
IUHS model sounds very similiar to an apprenticeship model of learning. Which is the approach midwives and physicians use to take decades/centuries ago. Actually in many countries midwives still follow this model.

Interesting....its too bad more states in America dont agree that a midwive approach is a good way to train medical doctors, otherwise, IUHS would be having a much easier time getting it's doctors licensed in America. Too bad indeed. :roll:

lswiltshire
06-22-2008, 11:49 AM
I unfortunately and inocently started teaching medical school formally at IUHS on the "campus" in St Kitts. They didnt even have as good a system as I have seen for traininf midwives in the British system.

The best part of the program on the "campus" were 1- The weekly question on Friday afternoons which programmed and practiced the students in the techniques of approaching exam questions & 2- exposure to patients at the local hospital under the supervision of UWI trained doctors.

Science novitiates were rushed through a 8 week fundametal block composed of material that is absorbed in most BSc programs or A levels or CAPE.

Then the other PBL blocks began. These were based on the case for the week. The campus staff met and decided what should be taught to address the cases. The rest of the material relevant to the "block" was given to the students to master on thier own with little guidance in the weekly readings. The course was thus not addressed by subjects. However, transcripts were given as though the students had proceeded and done the program by subject.

In the online program the PBL blocks were taught by a solitary teacher stationed in FL. It was clear that it was impossible for him to do all that was necessary on his own.

Online students were expected to come to St Kitts for a short period

Maybe there is a place for online schools etc but a certain amount of guidsnce is surely needed. Many of the concepts that modern doctors must grasp as very complex even for an island scholar.

It is interesting that IUHS grads get licensed; but I can tell you that when I apply for a job and folk see that I have taught at IUHS & UHSA they laugh me to scorn.

Communications Officer
07-05-2008, 07:06 AM
On looking over the recent correspondence, I find material that does not reflect the rigor and scholarship that out current Dean demands. We run a tight ship. I would be happy to give you a test equivalent to the ones I just submitted, but I doubt if you would pass. PM me if you are up to it and I will send the questions to you.

maximillian genossa
07-07-2008, 06:31 PM
On looking over the recent correspondence, I find material that does not reflect the rigor and scholarship that out current Dean demands. We run a tight ship. I would be happy to give you a test equivalent to the ones I just submitted, but I doubt if you would pass. PM me if you are up to it and I will send the questions to you.

Who is going to proctor the exam? ;)

AUCMD2006
07-07-2008, 06:58 PM
Who is going to proctor the exam? ;)


same person who proctors their students exams. i will get my buddy from radiology or my uncle the surgeorn to "proctor" my exam. the model they use if having someone you know and hand pick to monitor you is a joke..send me the exam I will take it wile its "proctored" and google a 100% on it like most of your students probably do

kryptik
07-07-2008, 07:02 PM
Who is going to proctor the exam? ;)
in some online courses exams are taken at a library where a library proctor is used, maybe iuhs follows same approach, again maybe.;)

Communications Officer
07-09-2008, 03:36 PM
Our Block exam proctoring system for students who write a Block exam off campus requires that the proctor is pre-registered and approved by the school for the sitting of that specific exam. The proctor is an adult with an arm’s length relationship to the student, including not being their supervisor or supervisee. The proctor signs a legal affidavit in which they ensure that defined examination conditions have been guaranteed. Students indeed frequently do use local university staff as proctors as this is a rapidly developing courtesy that institutions are extending to each other as online exams are becoming more commonplace. Libraries aren’t working out very well as exam taking venues (many libraries have automatic time limits on the patron’s use of computers that kick them out of the exam!). In addition to onsite observation by the proctor, the IUHS examining system records the start and stop time of the exam and cuts off the exam at the maximum time allowance (if the answers have not already been submitted). The above protocol is an option for only the Block exams, the major exams of the program are proctored directly by IUHS.

All IUHS written examinations use USMLE timing conditions with USMLE style questions where cheating or access to material or assistance would not be easily accomplished successfully. As a control for exam irregularities IUHS monitors individual student performance on these major exams compared to their Block exams. If a significant difference were discovered between major and Block exams, then an investigation of the student’s performances, exam server records and the proctors’ reports would be made, including subpoenaing the proctor if necessary.

maximillian genossa
07-09-2008, 04:07 PM
Ever considered using prometrics?

AUCMD2006
07-09-2008, 06:27 PM
i'm still waitin for my exam...and how hard is it to find someone to proctor an exam and sign a piece of paper...ok so you sign an affidavit..wooo big deal so you are signing a paper from some foreign school..what are the criminal charges for violating it? other than impact on the student what encourages a proctor to monitor an exam appropriately? other than that signed paper?

and i understand the time limits and such on test questions and that it is timed out but google really is pretty fast..say that if you half buttocks study material and you know 30% of the answers and answer then very quickly, another 30% you narrow down to 2 answers how long does it really take to get an answer on google to a very specific question? in less than one second there will likely be over 100,000 pages of answers...

i don't trust this testing system no matter what. if you guys did the PBL portion, and i think pbl or distance learning is more than ok, but then actually required all students in this program to travel or gather in one location to take the exam while professors administer the exam then it would be an entirtely different beast but the set up is a farce regardlkess of what "documentation" you have to back it up. i doubt you will have much to stand on defending this if a board ever questions it...it is a good start though as far as the distance learning i would love to do that and most of us do it already be it recording lectures or viewing review videos

Communications Officer
07-10-2008, 08:04 AM
Thanks, I will ask my colleagues about prometrics. If you re-read my description of the IUHS testing system, you will see that we are not giving the proctored exam system a free hand, but are testing it all the way with directly administered exams.

saviour
12-15-2008, 09:23 PM
i do not think that it is a question of hate, but of misunderstanding and being suspicious of an organization that looks as if it is doing things differently, like iuhs. Actually, i think that we are doing our best to maintain the standard wisdom of medical teaching. Although our preclinical phase is based on an online communication process, our students also have mentors where they live with which we encourage weekly meetings. We also use proctors for exams. Furthermore, the cases of the week (cow) are discussed in telephone conference calls in which the students meet with a faculty moderator. The students are not isolated, and are given every opportunity to interact with their teachers. Many professors give out their personal emails and phone numbers.


iuhs is incompetent in making doctors in india....changing rules now and then ...the students of iuhs doesnt know basic sciences at all/.....anatomy physiology pathology pharmac all pooorrrrr...they dont know anything...i really wonder what doctors they will be and how patients will be wen they go to treatment .......iuhs needs to shut down.....changing rules and what it is ..like helll.....no dissection????how r the students goin to learn surgical cuts and anatomy

staceystump
06-03-2009, 06:48 PM
I think you guys are very rude..This person is trying to explain their school and all you are doing is blasting him.. Manners go a long way.

lswiltshire
06-03-2009, 08:28 PM
Re I think you guys are very rude..This person is trying to explain their school and all you are doing is blasting him.. Manners go a long way.

Actually Stacey

The guys are only relating truths about experiences that folk have experienced at both IUHS and its subsidaries in India for this entire decade.

Since you are new you do not obviously know about all that has been shared in the past.

Please dont be so quick to judge.

carson56
06-08-2009, 03:01 PM
Isn't this school due for an accreditation review soon? The last one I saw was May of 2005. Was there since then or was that one for 5 years which takes it to 2010? (I thought I remember seeing that on the website in the past.) Would the government of St. Kitt's continue to accredit this school with such small growth compared to other schools on the island? Windsor and UMHS both built facilities there and IUHS has done nothing substantial since its inception.
They have also lost or removed faculty and staff in the last few months including the Dean that is listed on their website.

gwmed96
09-09-2009, 07:20 PM
Do not be so sure

msp
01-01-2010, 02:24 PM
In the coming months, I would like to take the occasional opportunity to clarify on ValueMD the nature and operation of IUHS. This is worth doing because the information communicated about IUHS on ValueMD is often inaccurate. Like other medical schools, the undergraduate curriculum of IUHS has a preclinical component and a clinical clerkship component. The preclinical component is made up of 10 blocks. The first 8 blocks are taught online. Block 9 is taught live on St. Kitts (one month – an introduction to clinical skills in medicine) and online for the remainder of this Block. Block 10 is an online review block preparatory to students taking USMLE Step 1. When students have passed USMLE Step 1, they are then eligible to begin various clinical clerkships in medical facilities (hospitals and physicians’ offices) which are like clerkships sponsored by other medical schools. Only the preclinical (basic medical science) experience is an online exercise, the clinical education occurs in live clinical settings.
Block 1 is an introduction to preclinical studies, and the 7 blocks that follow are organized by organ systems. Each week in first 8 blocks has a Case of the Week (CoW) that sets the tone for the week with some of the lectures relating directly to the CoW while other lectures on the organ systems discussed have a looser association with the CoW. The lectures are given in a broadcast format, where the faculty member accesses a server program through his/her computer/internet and students access the server programs through their computers/internet. The students see and hear the lecturer, see simultaneous PowerPoint presentations, and can communicate in real time with the lecturer (and other students) by a chat room. The lecturer can read comments and questions in the chat room and speak to these comments/questions during the lecture when appropriate. Students are also encouraged to email the lecturer using regular emails.
While this mode of lecturing is a type of distance learning, which many medical schools are working hard to establish, the communication is easier between the lecturer and the student than in the classical lecture hall environment, in that the student has direct and immediate access to the lecturer. Also, IUHS maintains an archive of the broadcasts that the students can access (students are encouraged to attend the live broadcast, so that they can get quick answers to questions that they may have). Students also have access to the lecturers’ PowerPoint files prior to the broadcasts, so that they can see the material prior to the broadcast.
The unique feature of this broadcast system is that there is no physical lecture hall. On this point there are differences of opinion. Some would say that the gathering of students into one room or a number of rooms (as is typical of most distance learning programs) is an important characteristic of higher learning. In our broadcast environment, the students can ‘chat’ with each other, so what is missing is only physical proximity (‘intellectual proximity’ is preserved). All are aware of the pros and cons of the lecture hall environment, so I will not discuss this aspect.
In conclusion, IUHS has developed a medical curriculum that allows students to pursue their preclinical medical studies in their home or workplace without giving up (but advisedly reducing) their ‘day job’. In these days of dwindling loans, this option may allow individuals (who would not otherwise be able to do so) to achieve their goal of becoming doctors. The clinical program is 100% live. IUHS is working hard to provide online material to back up, but never replace, the live clinical experience.
I welcome questions and comments from the ValueMD community regarding the current operation of IUHS.

I am one of the current IUHS students (holder of a PhD and an MSc) with a prior experience in medical sciences. I would like to assure everybody that what has been mentioned above regarding the IUHS medical curriculum is genuine and truthful. The most interesting feature of the IUHS programme is the problem based learning method adopted. After concluding block 1 which generally deals with general basic medical science such as biochemistry, physiology, molecular biology, etc. the next 8 blocks are taught endorsing the problem based learning. To clarify the PBL more: instead of studying the subjects of anatomy, histology, embryology, pathology, pharmacology, microbiology, clinical medicine or physiology as a one go subject during the 80 weeks preclinical programme, PBL is designed to allow all these subjects to be studied simultaneously focused on a system. For example: when studying the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM you will be taught live lectures (that will be placed on the school archive) by an anatomy professor on the chest (ribcage osseous structure, lungs gross anatomy, venous and arterial vascular; innervation, lymphatics, chest musculature, x-rays, ct-scans etc..). Likewise, in physiology you will be taught the physiology of respiration, gaseous exchanges etc..; in pathology, clinical medicine, pharmacology embryology histology, etc.. you are taught only subjects that have relevance to the respiratory system, in this case. The same applies to all other system. All lectures are LIVE and you can interact through the chat with the professor presenting the lecture. Throughout block you will take at least one comprehensive examination and the passmark is SEVENTY PERCENT (70%). Throughout your preclinical study you have a ‘local’ mentor with MBChB or MD qualification to provide you with a hand on clinical experience. You also have a weekly case discussion via telephone with a faculty member.
You will take up to of 95 lecture hours per block! So a VERY HARD WORK is expected inorder to cover the ample material given during a study period.
Below is a list of lectures given in block 1 and 2 (almost 3.5 months period):

Block 1 Lectures:
B1, Immuno: Innate Immunity, Aug09 03:00PM for 1 hr
B1, Immuno: Acquired Immunity, Aug09 04:30PM for 1 hr
B1, Mol Bio: DNA Code, Aug09 09:30PM for 1 hr

B1, Overview Cell Physiology 1, Aug09 11:30AM for 1 hr
B1, Biochem: Intro to Biochem, Aug09 07:30PM for 1 hr
B1, Biochem: Amino Acids, Aug09 09:00PM for 1 hr
B1, Micro: Bact Structure & Function, Aug09 10:30PM for 1 hr

B1, Biochem: Protein Structure, Aug09 07:30PM for 1 hr
B1, Biochem: Enzymes 1, Aug09 09:00PM for 1 hr
B1, Micro: Bact Metabolism & Genetics, Aug09 10:30PM for 1 hr

B1, Overview Cell Physiology 2, Aug09 11:30AM for 1 hr
B1, Biochem: Enzymes 2, Aug09 07:30PM for 1 hr
B1, Biochem: Acid/Base, CANCELLED Aug09 09:00PM for 1 hr

B1, Overview Neurophysiology 1, Aug09 11:30AM for 1 hr
B1, Mol Bio: Chromosomes, Aug09 09:30PM for 1 hr

B1, Biochem: Fed & Fasting States, Aug09 07:30PM for 1 hr
B1, Biochem: Structure of Carbohydrates , Aug09 09:00PM for 1 hr
B1, Micro: Staphylococci, Aug09 10:30PM for 1 hr

Conf 1, 800-977-8002 or 404-920-6650, ID 56633379 07:30PM for 1 hr
B1, Mol Bio: Genetic Mutations, Aug09 09:30PM for 1 hr

B1, Biochem: Glycolysis, Aug09 07:30PM for 1 hr
B1, Biochem: TCA Cycle, Aug09 09:00PM for 1 hr
B1, Micro: Streptococci, Aug09 10:30PM for 1 hr

B1, Overview Neurophysiology 2, Aug09 11:30AM for 1 hr
B1, Biochem: Bioenergetics & ETC, Aug09 07:30PM for 1 hr
B1, Biochem: Gluconeogenesis, Aug09 09:00PM for 1 hr
B1, Micro: Enteric Gram Neg Rods, Aug09 10:30PM for 1 hr

Conf 2, 800-977-8002 or 404-920-6650, ID 56633379 07:30PM for 1 hr
B1, Mol Bio: Mitochondria, Aug09 09:30PM for 1 hr

B1, Biochem: Glycogen Metabolism, Aug09 07:30PM for 1 hr
B1, Biochem: Mono- & Di-Saccharides, Aug09 09:00PM for 1 hr
B1, Micro: Non-Fermenters, Aug09 10:30PM for 1 hr

B1, Overview Neurophysiology 1, Aug09 11:30AM for 1 hr
B1, Mol Bio: Chromosomes, Aug09 09:30PM for 1 hr

B1, Biochem: Fed & Fasting States, Aug09 07:30PM for 1 hr
B1, Biochem: Structure of Carbohydrates , Aug09 09:00PM for 1 hr
B1, Micro: Staphylococci, Aug09 10:30PM for 1 hr

Conf 1, 800-977-8002 or 404-920-6650, ID 56633379 07:30PM for 1 hr
B1, Mol Bio: Genetic Mutations, Aug09 09:30PM for 1 hr

B1, Biochem: Glycolysis, Aug09 07:30PM for 1 hr
B1, Biochem: TCA Cycle, Aug09 09:00PM for 1 hr
B1, Micro: Streptococci, Aug09 10:30PM for 1 hr

B1, Overview Neurophysiology 2, Aug09 11:30AM for 1 hr
B1, Biochem: Bioenergetics & ETC, Aug09 07:30PM for 1 hr
B1, Biochem: Gluconeogenesis, Aug09 09:00PM for 1 hr
B1, Micro: Enteric Gram Neg Rods, Aug09 10:30PM for 1 hr


Block 2 Lectures:

B2, Physio: Pulmonary Ventilation 1, Oct09
B2, Anatomy: Thorax, Oct09
B2, Anatomy: Lungs, Oct09

B2, Physio: Pulmonary Ventilation 2 Oct09
B2, Micro: Rickettsia, Oct09

B2, Pharm: Antibiotics 1, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Antibiotics 2, Oct09

B2, Physio: Pulmonary Blood Flow, Oct09

B2, Embryo: Lungs, Oct09
B2, Path: Lung Disorders 1, Oct09

B2, Clin Dis: Asthma, Oct09
B2, Histo: Lungs 1, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Tx of TB, Oct09
B2, Micro: Legionella, Oct09

B2, Physio: Pulmonary Diffusion 1, Oct09
B2, Histo: Lungs 2, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Tx of Asthma & COPD 1, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Tx of Asthma & COPD 2, Oct09
B2, Micro: Viruses, Oct09

B2, Path: Lung Disorders 2, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Autocoids, Oct09
B2, Micro: Hepatitis & Enteric Viruses, Oct09

B2, Clin Dis: Pneumonia, Oct09
B2, Physio: Pulmonary Diffusion 2, Oct09

B2, Path: Lung Disorders 3, Oct09

B2, Clin Dis: Tuberculosis, Oct09
B2, Micro: Respiratory Infections 1, Oct09
B2, Micro: Respiratory Infections 2, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Glucocorticoids & Eicosanoids 1, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Glucocorticoids & Eicosanoids 2, Oct09
B2, Micro: Respiratory Viruses, Oct09

B2, Physio: O2 & CO2 Transport 1, Oct09
Conf 2, 800-977-8002 or 404-920-6650, ID 56633379
B2, Path: Blood Vessel Disorders 1, Oct09
B2, Micro: Prions & RetroViruses, Oct09

B2, Physio: O2 & CO2 Transport 2, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Tx of Respiratory Infections, Oct09
B2, Micro: Exanthem Viruses, Oct09

B2, Clin Dis: Lung Cancer, Oct09
B2, Physio: Regulation of Breathing 1, Oct09

B2, Physio: Regulation of Breathing 2, Oct09
Conf 3, 800-977-8002 or 404-920-6650, ID 56633379
B2, Pharm: Tx of Interstitial Lung Disease, Oct09

B2, Clin Dis: COPD, Oct09
B2, Physio: Heart Molecules & Membranes, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Chemotherapy Lung Tumors, Oct09
B2, Path: Congenital Heart Diseases, Oct09
B2, Micro: Fungal Classifications/ Yeasts, Oct09

B2, Physio: Heart as a Pump, Oct09
B2, Micro: Fungal Respiratory Infections, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Automonics 1, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Automonics 1, Oct09
B2, Path: Blood Vessel Disorders 2, Oct09

B2, Micro: Virulence Factors 1, Oct09
B2, Micro: Virulence Factors 2, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Vasoactive Polypeptides, Oct09
B2, Micro: Molds, Oct09

B2, Clin Dis: Asbestosis, Oct09
B2, Physio: Cardiac Output, Oct09
B2, Anatomy: Mediastinum, Oct09
B2, Anatomy: Heart, Oct09
B2, Histo: Heart, Oct09
B2, Path: Blood Vessel Disorders 3, Oct09

B2, Physio: Heart Electrical Conduction, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Atherogenesis & Cholesterolemia, Oct09
B2, Path: Acquired Heart Diseases 1, Oct09

B2, Clin Dis: Atherosclerosis, Oct09
B2, Physio: ECG 1, Oct09
Conf 4, 800-977-8002 or 404-920-6650, ID 56633379
B2, Pharm: Anti-Hypertensive Agents, Oct09
B2, Path: Acquired Heart Diseases 2, Oct09
B2, Micro: Dimorphic Fungi, Oct09

B2, Physio: ECG 2, Oct09

B2, Embryo: Mediastinal Vessels, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Cardiac Arrhythmias 1, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Cardiac Arrhythmias 2, Oct09
B2, Micro: Ectoparasites, Oct09

B2, Embryo: Heart, Oct09
B2, Clin Dis: Myocardial Infarction, Oct09
B2, Physio: ECG 3, Oct09

Conf 5, 800-977-8002 or 404-920-6650, ID 56633379

B2, Clin Dis: Congestive Heart Failure, Oct09
B2, Physio: ECG 4, Oct09
Conf 6, 800-977-8002 or 404-920-6650, ID 56633379
B2, Pharm: Lipid Lowering Drugs 1, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Lipid Lowering Drugs 2, Oct09
B2, Micro: Enteric Protozoa, Oct09

B2, Physio: ECG 5, Oct09
B2, Physio: ECG 6, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Coronary Heart Disease, Oct09

B2, Physio: ECG 7, Oct09
B2, Micro: Blood & Tissue Protozoa, Oct09

B2, Clin Dis: Hypertension, Oct09
B2, Anatomy: Review of Thorax, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Congestive Heart Failure 1, Oct09
B2, Pharm: Congestive Heart Failure 2, Oct09
B2, Micro: Helminths, Oct09







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