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punjboy
12-16-2007, 05:23 AM
heya everyone..
i am a newbie in this community and well.. was reading threads and they were quiet helpful.
well i am a 2nd year student doing my bachelors with Major Biology in Michigan. I want to go ahead nto dentistry and well i have heard about school in poland.
first, are these schools well enough recognized by U.S, so that even after completing the 5 year DDS programme that i can return and go thru the licencing without any futher upgradation?
How can i get started towards my process for addmission. and what all options do i have to when it comes to choosing univ.

thanks in advance..

ad:confused:

oshka55
12-31-2007, 07:35 AM
heya everyone..
i am a newbie in this community and well.. was reading threads and they were quiet helpful.
well i am a 2nd year student doing my bachelors with Major Biology in Michigan. I want to go ahead nto dentistry and well i have heard about school in poland.
first, are these schools well enough recognized by U.S, so that even after completing the 5 year DDS programme that i can return and go thru the licencing without any futher upgradation?
How can i get started towards my process for addmission. and what all options do i have to when it comes to choosing univ.

thanks in advance..

ad:confused:


hey! I think you have to do 2 more years of US dental school on top on the 5 years in Poland. Poznan has a pretty good dental school and the facilities are brand new. Good luck

punjboy
01-21-2008, 07:54 AM
hey.. thanks for the reply. but even after completing 5 years in poland and transfering back. how hard is it to get into a dental school in U.S . Like what all exam process i have to go through.?

thanks

punjboy
01-21-2008, 07:55 AM
hey! I think you have to do 2 more years of US dental school on top on the 5 years in Poland. Poznan has a pretty good dental school and the facilities are brand new. Good luck
hey.. thanks for the reply. but even after completing 5 years in poland and transfering back. how hard is it to get into a dental school in U.S . Like what all exam process i have to go through.?

thanks

ultimatecred
05-15-2008, 02:08 AM
This post is old...but for students wanting information on dentistry & having a hard time finding it, here's what I wrote previously in another thread (I have to re-paste it as opposed to providing the link to the thread b/c i'm a newbie in this forum with less than 20 posts..lol):


If u plan on practicing dentistry in the u.s or canada, DONT study outside those two countries. The rules for dentistry r much different & they treat all foreign degrees (from any country...even japan) like garbage.

There is alot of headache. If you do follow this route, first you are required to complete the examinations for licensing (that is, if your foreign university program is eligible). You have to pass these with out of this world flying colours. I'm talking 80%-90% with 80 being the absolute minimum for most schools in the u.s & canada.

Secondly, with these scores, you have to apply to a university of choice in the u.s and canada with all your documentation including your transcript, your licensing examination marks, letters of recommendation, experience, etc...

If they like your package, they will only then invite you to an interview.

If you pass the interview, then you're amongst geniuses because each school only selects from 5-10 students anually for this bridging program.

K lets say now that you do gain a seat in this program. You haven't seen anything yet. Now you have to undergo a 6 week transition course. Upon completion, you are seated in the beginning of the 3rd year of the university you have been accepted to.

At this point, if you do accomplish all that, now you are home-free to go after establishing a practice.

Therefore, I suggest if you want to do your dentistry degree ANYWHERE abroad (other than U.S & Canada) that you stay in that region & practice there. If you want to get the degree in Europe, then you best plan on staying there.

By the way, there are no dentistry studies there, save for one. I believe it is @ West Indies. But if you plan on studying dentistry there, then read the above post with the information.

Everything I said about dentistry is true except for the state of MINNESOTA. If the university you study at is recognized, then that state DOES NOT require the additional rigorous 2 years of education at a university institution in the states. If you can pass the licensing examinations in the U.S, you can practice there with a foreign degree. The reason that this state does this is because they're short of dentists. You should look into Hawaii too because I think they have a similar setup.

jp9094
05-15-2008, 05:20 AM
I think I can add something here. I am a US Citizen who grew up and was educated in New York. In the mid 70's I moved to France to study medicine, but was shunted into dentistry as (in spite of my surname) French was not a language I was familiar with at the time. I graduated with the DDS and passed both part 1 and 2 of the National Board of Dental Examiners. However, even with this I was not able to obtain licensing anywhere in the US. Strangely enough, I was allowed to do an Anesthesiology residency at a US hospital.Due to my family situation, I then moved to Australia and have been in practice there ever since.

I have followed developments in Dental licensing for many years now. Every dental Act in every state now has an 'educational' requirement, which means only graduates of US and Canadian schools can be licensed.

If you graduate from a foreign dental school,you would be required to pass part 1 of the NBDE then you would be required to do a minimum of 2 years at an American dental school, at a minimum of US$50,000 per year. You would then need to pass part 2 of the NBDE and do either a regional or state board (a practical exam) or, if you want to practice in New York State do a 1 year General Practice residency (as of 1/1/07 I think).

I will state that there is no reason you could not do the Parts of the NBDE while you are still a student (as I did), but they are only valid for 5 years. The exam is not that difficult ,if you study (like the USMLE).

There are one or 2 exceptions to the above. For example, If you graduate from a foreign dental school, do a residency and become Board Certified in Pedodontia, The Maryland State Dental Act will give you a License to practice. Also, the State of California (always off on their own!) Has approved a Mexican Dental school for the purposes of their Act and, if you graduate from there, you could get a California Dental License!!!You should read all the state dental acts to find out more.

All I can say is good luck and think hard before you proceed.

A.J. Lepere DDS, FADSA, JP
Diplomate, National Board of Dental Anesthesiology

jp9094
05-15-2008, 05:24 AM
I think I can add something here. I am a US Citizen who grew up and was educated in New York. In the mid 70's I moved to France to study medicine, but was shunted into dentistry as (in spite of my surname) French was not a language I was familiar with at the time. I graduated with the DDS and passed both part 1 and 2 of the National Board of Dental Examiners. However, even with this I was not able to obtain licensing anywhere in the US. Strangely enough, I was allowed to do an Anesthesiology residency at a US hospital.Due to my family situation, I then moved to Australia and have been in practice there ever since.

I have followed developments in Dental licensing for many years now. Every dental Act in every state now has an 'educational' requirement, which means only graduates of US and Canadian schools can be licensed.

If you graduate from a foreign dental school,you would be required to pass part 1 of the NBDE then you would be required to do a minimum of 2 years at an American dental school, at a minimum of US$50,000 per year. You would then need to pass part 2 of the NBDE and do either a regional or state board (a practical exam) or, if you want to practice in New York State do a 1 year General Practice residency (as of 1/1/07 I think).

I will state that there is no reason you could not do the Parts of the NBDE while you are still a student (as I did), but they are only valid for 5 years. The exam is not that difficult ,if you study (like the USMLE).

There are one or 2 exceptions to the above. For example, If you graduate from a foreign dental school, do a residency and become Board Certified in Pedodontia, The Maryland State Dental Act will give you a License to practice. Also, the State of California (always off on their own!) Has approved a Mexican Dental school for the purposes of their Act and, if you graduate from there, you could get a California Dental License!!!You should read all the state dental acts to find out more.

All I can say is good luck and think hard before you proceed.

A.J. Lepere DDS, FADSA, JP
Diplomate, National Board of Dental Anesthesiology







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