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FutureMD46
08-25-2007, 12:18 AM
Hi
Im a soon to be student at Xavier Bonaire and was wondering what everybody thought of a college student, 2 years in, going to the island and finishing up their requirements for the 90 hours in one semester and then starting their medical program. The reason for me skipping out on college is because i have the opportunity to speed up my medical career. I also have no chance in hell of getting into an american medical program. I know the owners of this school and they are all accomplished doctors in the united states, and their curriculum is based on the NEOUCOM program. I know that the professors have all taught in the US as well. My biggest concern is not getting my **. Is that going to have any barring on residency chances or will that work to my advantage in seeing that i am ambitious.

Honestly, my choices are stick out another 2-3 years in the states to finish my ** and then apply to medical schools, or go here for 4 years and cut of 3 years of schooling and be able to start my career sooner than most.

Opinions please...

PS Im not indian or pakistani and my parents have never harbored my dream of becoming a physician they have shunned it.

khsyed
08-25-2007, 02:09 AM
very good questions?

Dr. Diva
09-04-2007, 11:07 PM
********
I think if you are very passionate about becoming a DR. then you should perhaps attend Xavier...i know im in the same boat as you that i have no chance in hell gettin in with all the competition there is in the US. Plus, you have a better chance of workin your butt off in xavier and shinning then goin to a undergrad that has over 100 in you same major who are also tryin to apply for med skul. If your a US citizen and you do well on ur USMILE's and shine in your class. i doubt that u wud have a residency prob. but i dunno, my opinion.

dr.diva

jameslynton
09-21-2007, 08:42 AM
Hi
Im a soon to be student at Xavier Bonaire and was wondering what everybody thought of a college student, 2 years in, going to the island and finishing up their requirements for the 90 hours in one semester and then starting their medical program. The reason for me skipping out on college is because i have the opportunity to speed up my medical career. I also have no chance in hell of getting into an american medical program. I know the owners of this school and they are all accomplished doctors in the united states, and their curriculum is based on the NEOUCOM program. I know that the professors have all taught in the US as well. My biggest concern is not getting my **. Is that going to have any barring on residency chances or will that work to my advantage in seeing that i am ambitious.

Honestly, my choices are stick out another 2-3 years in the states to finish my ** and then apply to medical schools, or go here for 4 years and cut of 3 years of schooling and be able to start my career sooner than most.

Opinions please...

PS Im not indian or pakistani and my parents have never harbored my dream of becoming a physician they have shunned it.I think it is a bad idea - I hope you are not betting the farm on it. As the pre-med moderator I get PM's from people about different schools. Xavier is a franchised mom and pop operation. Since many of the profs will be heavily accented being an Indian or Pakistani would most like be an advantage. It is best to get a Bach of Sci or BA from a US school and apply to US medical schools. They are the true value in medicine at a US state medical school.

jameslynton
09-21-2007, 08:46 AM
********
I think if you are very passionate about becoming a DR. then you should perhaps attend Xavier......dr.divaThat sounds like a school official posing as a poster. This school was shut down and then reappeared on back on Bonaire. While the school admin's appear well meaning this is an unproven school.

e92er
09-21-2007, 08:10 PM
Although I can't speak for the actual island curriculum, I can attest that their clinical program is solid. I've finished all of my core rotations through them after transferring from another foreign school and have absolutely no complaints about the school's clinical years....

As for the OP askin about getting his **, I'm not too sure but I don't think it'll be a problem in the long run...well, I HOPE it won't be a problem...

dpatel987
09-28-2007, 03:10 PM
the smartest thing you could do is to ask students are are currently there and see what they have to say about it, rather than value md where you will NOT get the correct info.

jasano
10-30-2007, 12:29 PM
My take on it is that canadian and american schools take students on the basis of race and gender first and academics second. With this being the rule, rather than the exception, I think your GPA had better be pretty high if you hope to be one of the hundreds out of the thousands that they decide to take. As to premed, (and no I'm not some representative of Xavier Medical here), it will cost you $50,000 and 2-3 years in the u.s. This makes Xavier an attractive option for older students like myself (@$16,000!!), who lack the science background, but already have the degree.

Since canada effectively shut down all of it's premedical programs, except for one or two like the one in Red Deer Alberta, I'd have to cherry pick courses here. Not only would that be a much more expensive option, but also very time consuming as well. Plus when you add in the fact that you apply this year for the following year, you're looking at a long tortuous road of heartache and despair pursuing the north american option to medical school. (The continent no longer capitalized because it no longer deserves this level of respect.)

Maybe Xavier isn't your best option for medical school - I honestly don't know, (perhaps some other Caribbean schools or european schools might be better or worse), but I do think it is a better option to what's available here. Affirmative action? Equity? In choosing DOCTORS!!?? Enough with the discrimination already - I'm a firm believer in equality, but this bloody well ain't it. I didn't so much choose Xavier as I was booted out of canada on my male, white ***.

Sounds like you might be in the same boat.

chartero
10-30-2007, 01:47 PM
Since canada effectively shut down all of it's premedical programs, except for one or two like the one in Red Deer Alberta, I'd have to cherry pick courses here.

:neutral: Some source for or evidence of this, please?

jeeper2027
10-30-2007, 02:28 PM
My take on it is that canadian and american schools take students on the basis of race and gender first and academics second. .....

Since canada effectively shut down all of it's premedical programs........


Any sources or references?

wcb22
10-30-2007, 06:30 PM
one thing to consider is permanent licensure after you are done with residency. A LOT OF STATES require 90 hours of undergrad in order to get permanent licensure. There are some that only require 60, but I would say the majority want atleast 90. you could even complete your M.D., complete a residency, and still have problems with this. look into it. if the state(s) you are interested in only requires 60, great, but if not, keep doing those undergrad courses.

jasano
10-30-2007, 07:29 PM
Any sources or references?

There are lots of sources. Open your eyes and you'll see plenty.

First, from my own experience, I know that medical student lists I've seen scarcely have a male name on them let alone one I could pronounce. This is over a period of two years working as a nurse at a hospital. Second, University of Ottawa declared it had one competitve GPA for designated groups and one for the non-designated. University of Calgary bragged years ago how it had exceeded its quota of 50% female in it's medical program. Numerous other programs come right out and say that they have set aside seats from francophones and natives only etc. Mostly though, this kind of information is hidden from the public to keep the appearence of fairness. The Univeristy of Northern Ontario specifically told me of seats set aside for designated groups when contacted.

I would like to know how a doctor's son with 90+ percentile, male and white, with a masters degree, can't get into medical school after numerous attempts, and yet members of the designated groups, including female students, can get in with an incomplete bachelors and lower GPAs, but that's just me.

First do no harm - affirmative action medical school student Patrick Chavis has medical license suspended for gross negligence - Brief Article National Review - Find Articles (http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1282/is_n19_v49/ai_19866342)

National Review, October 13,1997:

Source from Website above: (Affirmative Action in medical schools has been going on for a long time. Where have you been?)

"Until recently, Patrick Chaviss claim to fame was that he was admitted to the University of California at Davis Medical School as an affirmative-action student in 1973 the year Allan Bakke was rejected. Because of Chaviss outspoken advocacy of racial preferences, the media sometimes referred to him as "the student admitted in Bakkes place although, strictly speaking, he was one of several possibilities.

Chavis went on to become an obstetrician/gynecologist in Compton, California, a mostly minority suburb of Los Angeles. Chavis also became a much-celebrated symbol of racial preferences. When the New York Times Magazine published Nicholas Lemanns ten-page paean to affirmative action in 1995, Dr. Chaviss picture graced the cover. Inside was a full-page photograph of him cradling a newborn.

During the Proposition 209 campaign, his name was difficult to escape. Sen. Edward Kennedy (D., Mass.) called him a "perfect example of the enormous dividends affirmative action has paid. Tom Hayden and Connie Rice argued that by practicing medicine in Compton, Dr. Chavis had contributed more to society than Dr. Bakke had: "Bakkes scores were higher, but who made the most of his medical-school education? From whom did California taxpayers benefit more?

Then came the fall from grace. Two months ago, citing his "inability to perform some of the most basic duties required of a physician, Judge Samuel Reyes ordered Dr. Chaviss license suspended. His "gross negligence and "incompetence had led to the death of one patient and near-fatal injuries to others. Allowing Chavis to continue practicing medicine, the judge wrote, would "endanger the public health, safety, and welfare." (end snippet: remainder of article at link above.)
------------------------------------------------------
BBC NEWS | World | Americas | Mixed ruling on US affirmative action (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/3013784.stm)


And Canada's McGill University, for example, reports that medical seats this year were 60.5 % women and 39.4% men. Those just aren’t good odds if you’re a guy. Quotas? Absolutely, professional schools like Medicine are rife with them. Do the school officials come right out and say it all the time, no, they try to hide the fact as much as possible.

jasano
10-30-2007, 07:34 PM
:neutral: Some source for or evidence of this, please?

? HUh?

Tell me where they're running if you are under the delusional opinion that they still exist. Premedical programs here don't exist, apart from the one I specified to the best of my knowledge. If you know of a couple of others, then by all means list them here. Bachelor's degrees in science are generally used for entry to medicine, but premedical programs, specifically those which could be completed in less than 4 years, simply do not exist.

Prove me wrong by all means.

(Source: Canada)

chartero
10-30-2007, 08:27 PM
Are you using your own definition of "premedical program?"

Do you mean a degree major called something like "Premedical Studies?" That would give absolutely no advantage whatsoever over a degree major in anything else with the prerequisite courses for medical school included. That this isn't common is nothing to complain about.

Do you mean a program offering those courses for someone with a bachelor's degree without them? Just get into any university or university college as a non-degree-seeking student. This is common and easy. Or apply for a second bachelor's degree in general science or biology or something; this might give some preference if the prerequisite classes were oversubscribed. You wouldn't have to finish the second degree. But hey, guess what? If premedical classes are oversubscribed, Canada certainly hasn't "closed" premedical programs.

I still don't get with certaintly what you mean. You say "closed" and that they don't "still exist." Name what they used to be called and where they used to be found. Explain why they offer anything required for medical school admission just taking the classes required for medical school, doing volunteer work on ones own, etc. wouldn't offer.

chartero
10-30-2007, 08:34 PM
First, from my own experience, I know that medical student lists I've seen scarcely have a male name on them let alone one I could pronounce.
Then there are probably male names you don't recognize.

jasano
10-30-2007, 08:39 PM
Then there are probably male names you don't recognize.

Absolutely not. I've also by the way, SEEN them. And can tell that very, very few of the med students have been male. Live in denial though, there are plenty of others living there with you at any given time.

chartero
10-30-2007, 08:44 PM
So you're driven to medical school at Xavier because Canadian, and I suppose American mainland, medical schools are so full of non-whites and women, these non-whites and women being admitted are the reason for your not, and all this is apparently leaving you a bitter, sputtering wreck?

Xavier Photo Galleries. (http://edu.xusom.nl/Xavier_Photo_Galleries.shtml#)

You're gonna learn you some irony.

Edited to add: jasano describes his position more fully in a later post below: "I have no problem whatsoever with the majority of a student population being non-white, or women for that matter. What bothers me is when quotas are used to put them there ahead of more qualified individuals." I will take him at his word.

chartero
10-30-2007, 08:50 PM
[won't bother quoting again, but jasano is playing the "reverse racism" card, talking about doctors with names who when he can pronounce them are all female, blaming affirmative action at Canadian and American medical schools for all this]

From the Xavier homepage, "Latest News," omitting surnames to respect the ValueMD house rules:

2007 Scholarship Recipients
• Shariff
• Rachel
• Stephanie
• Rushikesh
• Lesley
• Amanjot
• Ajayjeet

That is the complete list.

jasano
10-30-2007, 08:54 PM
Are you using your own definition of "premedical program?"

Do you mean a degree major called something like "Premedical Studies?" That would give absolutely no advantage whatsoever over a degree major in anything else with the prerequisite courses for medical school included. That this isn't common is nothing to complain about.

Do you mean a program offering those courses for someone with a bachelor's degree without them? Just get into any university or university college as a non-degree-seeking student. This is common and easy. Or apply for a second bachelor's degree in general science or biology or something; this might give some preference if the prerequisite classes were oversubscribed. You wouldn't have to finish the second degree. But hey, guess what? If premedical classes are oversubscribed, Canada certainly hasn't "closed" premedical programs.

I still don't get with certaintly what you mean. You say "closed" and that they don't "still exist." Name what they used to be called and where they used to be found. Explain why they offer anything required for medical school admission just taking the classes required for medical school, doing volunteer work on ones own, etc. wouldn't offer.

So anyway, you jumped over the posting about quotas and affirmative action, so I assume that you believe in inequality and the entitlements of the entitled, so I'll view everything you say from that vantage point henceforth. Fair enough?

When it comes to premed, what I mean is a course of study specifically designed for entry into medicine. That is to say, not a course designed as a degree in and of itself, no, unless that degree was designed specifically as a premedical program degree - such programs do exist in the United States.

Many universities used to run 'premedical programs'. You can believe this or not - I really could care less, and now they don't. What this does is make it more difficult for students who are trying to acquire the necessary science background to do so - degree in hand or not.

It is not as you say, 'easy' to assemble such courses on one's own, much less to schedule these courses yourself into a workable timetable, or to complete them in a reasonable period of time. I do not believe that a bachelor's degree in biochemistry say, (typically used), or (biology) would better prepare students for medicine than a program specifically designed for this purpose.

As I stated, Red Deer College in Alberta is the only college offering premedical studies in Canada that I am aware of. I will not search through reams and reams of texts to confirm for you that Canada has no other offerings in this area. If you want to do that kind of leg work, you do it yourself. Suffice to say, I spent plenty of time researching it already to come up with the one college.

You do the leg work and you'll see what I'm saying. I haven't the time nor inclination to do it for you.

jasano
10-30-2007, 09:00 PM
You're both idiots. Hopefully you fit into one of the minority classifications because you're going to need the special priveleging that that entails. I have no problem whatsoever with the majority of a student population being non-white, or women for that matter. What bothers me is when quotas are used to put them there ahead of more qualified individuals.

Xavier University itself claims to support policies of diversity, which likely means they also have an affirmative action policy of their own. Luckily they have a hell of a lot more openings, such that this is of lesser importance to prospective students.

Discrimination is wrong. There is no reverse to it. I suppose I might be inclined to believe in this kind of discrimination like you both if it benefitted me. It may well in fact, as I have native ancestry which is only a processing period away. Then maybe I'll cut in line ahead of you and you can tell me again how fair it is.

chartero
10-30-2007, 09:12 PM
So anyway, you jumped over the posting about quotas and affirmative action, so I assume that you believe in inequality and the entitlements of the entitled, so I'll view everything you say from that vantage point henceforth. Fair enough?

When it comes to premed, what I mean is a course of study specifically designed for entry into medicine. That is to say, not a course designed as a degree in and of itself, no, unless that degree was designed specifically as a premedical program degree - such programs do exist in the United States.

Many universities used to run 'premedical programs'. You can believe this or not - I really could care less, and now they don't. What this does is make it more difficult for students who are trying to acquire the necessary science background to do so - degree in hand or not.

It is not as you say, 'easy' to assemble such courses on one's own, much less to schedule these courses yourself into a workable timetable, or to complete them in a reasonable period of time. I do not believe that a bachelor's degree in biochemistry say, (typically used), or (biology) would better prepare students for medicine than a program specifically designed for this purpose.

As I stated, Red Deer College in Alberta is the only college offering premedical studies in Canada that I am aware of. I will not search through reams and reams of texts to confirm for you that Canada has no other offerings in this area. If you want to do that kind of leg work, you do it yourself. Suffice to say, I spent plenty of time researching it already to come up with the one college.

You do the leg work and you'll see what I'm saying. I haven't the time nor inclination to do it for you.

Athabasca University: How to become a Physician. (http://www.athabascau.ca/counselling/physician.php)

Athabasca is an open-admissions public university offering distance learning courses with home and home-computer labs where scheduling and class capacity would not be issues at all. I believe they offer rolling admissions to courses every month. These are university credit courses applicable to university degrees. They are described on a page called "How to become a Physician." The page talks about "many" Athabasca premedical students, even to the point of saying "many pre-med students at AU are 'preaccepted' to a professional school, as long as they complete some of these subjects."

I suppose a few medical schools might redline courses with home or home-computer labs. Not so many that they don't have "many pre-med students," even where their medical schools basically send them to Athabasca to finish their prerequisites.

What's more, besides being a Canadian public university and a full member of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, Athabasca is the first Canadian university with U.S. regional accreditation. This would put an them in better stead with American medical schools than other sources, probably saving paperwork for foreign credential evaluations at some schools and so on.

It took me seconds to find this.

jasano
10-31-2007, 07:00 AM
Athabasca University: How to become a Physician. (http://www.athabascau.ca/counselling/physician.php)

Athabasca is an open-admissions public university offering distance learning courses with home and home-computer labs where scheduling and class capacity would not be issues at all. I believe they offer rolling admissions to courses every month. These are university credit courses applicable to university degrees. They are described on a page called "How to become a Physician." The page talks about "many" Athabasca premedical students, even to the point of saying "many pre-med students at AU are 'preaccepted' to a professional school, as long as they complete some of these subjects."

I suppose a few medical schools might redline courses with home or home-computer labs. Not so many that they don't have "many pre-med students," even where their medical schools basically send them to Athabasca to finish their prerequisites.

What's more, besides being a Canadian public university and a full member of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, Athabasca is the first Canadian university with U.S. regional accreditation. This would put an them in better stead with American medical schools than other sources, probably saving paperwork for foreign credential evaluations at some schools and so on.

It took me seconds to find this.

I was already well aware of Athabasca University's distance education programs and had considered them in my search, however, and this is a big, however, learning at a distance is much more difficult than learning in a classroom. I have taken distance education courses in the past, and you are literally equating apples and oranges yet again. If you feel that this is a route that suits you, then by all means pursue it. I think that doing laboratories at a distance and not having the one to one assistance available in a classroom setting will make such studies more difficult. Still, Athabasca might be one of your better choices if you're stuck on, or in, Canada.

While they are worthy of consideration, I doubt very much that successful completion of any of their programs would guarantee entry into a Medical program. I'm not sure what the term 'preaccepted' means in that context.

dpatel987
10-31-2007, 01:51 PM
Jameslynton- not everyone on this works for the school. Or is that your comeback twds everyone?
I guess being on this all the time must get to you. It's ok.

FutureMD46
11-02-2007, 01:19 AM
WOW!!!! Can someone ask a ? question without an argument about a completely different topic!!! Who cares if you are the "right" person on some forum? Let someone believe what they want to believe and just quit talking about it. 2 posts with answers to the ? and 3 pages of arguing... Are you people in medical school or 5th grade?

I would really like to see how many of you are student...

POST WHERE YOU GO TO SCHOOL AFTER ME

chartero
11-02-2007, 09:58 AM
Like I've posted elsewhere on vmd, I'm not in medical school.

jasano
11-02-2007, 07:24 PM
WOW!!!! Can someone ask a ? question without an argument about a completely different topic!!! Who cares if you are the "right" person on some forum? Let someone believe what they want to believe and just quit talking about it. 2 posts with answers to the ? and 3 pages of arguing... Are you people in medical school or 5th grade?

I would really like to see how many of you are student...

POST WHERE YOU GO TO SCHOOL AFTER ME

Firstly, I do not think it's a mark of immaturity to discuss divergences of opinion. Even more importantly, it is vital that issues like discrimination, (which you yourself alluded to in your opening), ARE discussed. In effect, I was well and truly done discussing this matter before your posting - quotas are discrimination period, and I referred my detractors to an article noting gross incompetence and even patient deaths under the care of a physician who was taken in under affirmative action policies. Affirmative action in medical school admissions is a serious matter with serious consequences. Anyone above a grade 5 level would be able to see that.

Since I have presented reasoned arguments only to have them callously disgarded, I think there is no point in citing further examples - obviously those who believe they derive some benefit from affirmative action policies will continue to defend them no matter how deep in hypocrisy they may find themselves.

I myself am an honor's graduate from a bachelor of science in nursing degree and hold a college degree and certificate as well. I am not currently attending medical school, but I may be doing so if I can get through the mound of paper work necessary for immigration, within the time constraints placed upon me. I share your concerns with regards to admission chances to Canadian/American Universities and likewise believe that the accelerated programs of study offered by Xavier would be of benefit to my situation as well. Since I plan on attending Xavier's premedical program in January, I could let you know my thoughts on the program first hand in a few months time.

FutureMD46
11-03-2007, 05:09 PM
The only reason i stated im not asian is because people were asking if i was and if my parents were forcing me to going to medical school early. I wasnt stating anything about discrimination. I think that medical schools do a very good job at not discriminating against anyone. For the most part, they discriminate against personality. If you are an honors student, but have the personality of a toilet seat, your not going to make a good doctor. Plain and simple. I know i wouldnt want to go into surgery with someone who has a bad attitude or cant carry on a conversation with me.

eastern2western
11-03-2007, 09:25 PM
Athabasca University: How to become a Physician. (http://www.athabascau.ca/counselling/physician.php)

Athabasca is an open-admissions public university offering distance learning courses with home and home-computer labs where scheduling and class capacity would not be issues at all. I believe they offer rolling admissions to courses every month. These are university credit courses applicable to university degrees. They are described on a page called "How to become a Physician." The page talks about "many" Athabasca premedical students, even to the point of saying "many pre-med students at AU are 'preaccepted' to a professional school, as long as they complete some of these subjects."

I suppose a few medical schools might redline courses with home or home-computer labs. Not so many that they don't have "many pre-med students," even where their medical schools basically send them to Athabasca to finish their prerequisites.

What's more, besides being a Canadian public university and a full member of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, Athabasca is the first Canadian university with U.S. regional accreditation. This would put an them in better stead with American medical schools than other sources, probably saving paperwork for foreign credential evaluations at some schools and so on.

It took me seconds to find this.
The last time I checked, there is no state in USA acceptes a diploma from some onlline medical unversity. If you only care about having a nice looking piece of paper on your wall while mopping floors at your local mcdonal, then you should attend this distance university.

eastern2western
11-03-2007, 09:29 PM
Hi
Im a soon to be student at Xavier Bonaire and was wondering what everybody thought of a college student, 2 years in, going to the island and finishing up their requirements for the 90 hours in one semester and then starting their medical program. The reason for me skipping out on college is because i have the opportunity to speed up my medical career. I also have no chance in hell of getting into an american medical program. I know the owners of this school and they are all accomplished doctors in the united states, and their curriculum is based on the NEOUCOM program. I know that the professors have all taught in the US as well. My biggest concern is not getting my **. Is that going to have any barring on residency chances or will that work to my advantage in seeing that i am ambitious.

Honestly, my choices are stick out another 2-3 years in the states to finish my ** and then apply to medical schools, or go here for 4 years and cut of 3 years of schooling and be able to start my career sooner than most.

Opinions please...

PS Im not indian or pakistani and my parents have never harbored my dream of becoming a physician they have shunned it.
You should stay and finish your undergrad or at least get 90 units. There is one detail you probably did not read about the 90 unit requirement and that is those units must be from a us-accredited university. If this xavier medical school is us-accredite, then the units you take will count for your 90 unit requirement. Last time I checked, the school is not us accredited. Basically, it means their pre-med units are worth less. If you do not believe me, then you should take your chances.

jameslynton
11-03-2007, 09:34 PM
Jameslynton- not everyone on this works for the school. Or is that your comeback twds everyone?
I guess being on this all the time must get to you. It's ok.I love hearing from my fans. Enough said.

eastern2western
11-03-2007, 09:37 PM
My take on it is that canadian and american schools take students on the basis of race and gender first and academics second. With this being the rule, rather than the exception, I think your GPA had better be pretty high if you hope to be one of the hundreds out of the thousands that they decide to take. As to premed, (and no I'm not some representative of Xavier Medical here), it will cost you $50,000 and 2-3 years in the u.s. This makes Xavier an attractive option for older students like myself (@$16,000!!), who lack the science background, but already have the degree.

Since canada effectively shut down all of it's premedical programs, except for one or two like the one in Red Deer Alberta, I'd have to cherry pick courses here. Not only would that be a much more expensive option, but also very time consuming as well. Plus when you add in the fact that you apply this year for the following year, you're looking at a long tortuous road of heartache and despair pursuing the north american option to medical school. (The continent no longer capitalized because it no longer deserves this level of respect.)

Maybe Xavier isn't your best option for medical school - I honestly don't know, (perhaps some other Caribbean schools or european schools might be better or worse), but I do think it is a better option to what's available here. Affirmative action? Equity? In choosing DOCTORS!!?? Enough with the discrimination already - I'm a firm believer in equality, but this bloody well ain't it. I didn't so much choose Xavier as I was booted out of canada on my male, white ***.

Sounds like you might be in the same boat.
I live in cali and I know premeds do not cost 50-60 k for 2-3 years. In my local community college, the cost per semester unit is 30 dollars and that is way cheaper than any carribbean university outthere. Another great thing is local state universities will offer you a ton of free money (cal-grant, pell grant, fee waiver or what ever else is available) for your undergrad education as long as you can financially qualify. Last time I checked, all caribbean schools can only offer you loans and you are obligated to pay them back.

jasano
11-03-2007, 10:35 PM
I live in cali and I know premeds do not cost 50-60 k for 2-3 years. In my local community college, the cost per semester unit is 30 dollars and that is way cheaper than any carribbean university outthere. Another great thing is local state universities will offer you a ton of free money (cal-grant, pell grant, fee waiver or what ever else is available) for your undergrad education as long as you can financially qualify. Last time I checked, all caribbean schools can only offer you loans and you are obligated to pay them back.

I'd be required to pay everything back just the same as I am coming from Canada. The United States, the Carribbean, it's really all the same thing as far as I'm concerned, and just as expensive. $30.00? for a course? I doubt there's a university or college on the planet that would offer a course for that amount, apart from perhaps a one day seminar.

eastern2western
11-03-2007, 10:40 PM
I'd be required to pay everything back just the same as I am coming from Canada. The United States, the Carribbean, it's really all the same thing as far as I'm concerned, and just as expensive. $30.00? for a course? I doubt there's a university or college on the planet that would offer a course for that amount, apart from perhaps a one day seminar.
It is actually 20 dollars per semester unit. A regular science course is about 5 semester units and the semester is 16 weeks long. For example, organic chemistry is a five unit course with lab included and the total cost is about 100 dollars. In california, 12 semester units is classify as being a full time student and most people typically take on 15 semester units. Even taking 15 units, it is about 600 dollars per semester and 1200 dollars for two semesters which is equivalent to one year. All classes I take in this college is transferrable in california and that means they are equivalent to any equivalent college undergrad units with in california. If you want to check, here is the link.
RC HomePage (http://www.reedleycollege.edu/)

chartero
11-03-2007, 11:44 PM
The last time I checked, there is no state in USA acceptes a diploma from some onlline medical unversity.

Look again - this is just for undergraduate premed coursework! From a Canadian public university owned by the province of Alberta and with the same U.S. regional accreditation from the Middle States Association as Columbia, Princeton, SUNY, Rutgers etc. Premedical courses by distance which would be widely if maybe not universally acceptable for admission to a real on-the-ground med school, then one of those real on-the-ground med schools.

ETA: They meet the lab requirements with home labs and, as on-the-ground colleges do more and more, computer labs.

chartero
11-03-2007, 11:47 PM
eastern2western is right about in-state tuition at California community colleges. It is famously only $20 per semester hour, and this is after some substantial increases in recent years. Tuition for out-of-state residents including international students is based on cost and I believe set by each individual college, but I think these are still generally modest, probably in a band under $200 a semester hour?

eastern2western
11-03-2007, 11:50 PM
Look again - this is just for undergraduate premed coursework! From a Canadian public university owned by the province of Alberta and with the same U.S. regional accreditation from the Middle States Association as Columbia, Princeton, SUNY, Rutgers etc. Premedical courses by distance which would be widely if maybe not universally acceptable for admission to a real on-the-ground med school, then one of those real on-the-ground med schools.
some universities do offer intro-science course via distance learning, but most of the ones that require labwork (biology, micro, anatomy, physiology, chemistry, physics) have to be done in a physical setting. A lot of times, the online courses requires much more work than regular classes because they have to make for the class attendance time.

FutureMD46
11-04-2007, 01:52 AM
[User can't play nice]

FutureMD46
11-04-2007, 01:56 AM
You should stay and finish your undergrad or at least get 90 units. There is one detail you probably did not read about the 90 unit requirement and that is those units must be from a us-accredited university. If this xavier medical school is us-accredite, then the units you take will count for your 90 unit requirement. Last time I checked, the school is not us accredited. Basically, it means their pre-med units are worth less. If you do not believe me, then you should take your chances.

Thanks for your response to MY question. I appreciate it. But, in regards to the 90 unit requirement, how do people from other countries, that do their undergrad at a university over seas meet that requirement?

tincy25
11-04-2007, 02:24 AM
hi which is good medical college in india.?

eastern2western
11-04-2007, 02:45 PM
Thanks for your response to MY question. I appreciate it. But, in regards to the 90 unit requirement, how do people from other countries, that do their undergrad at a university over seas meet that requirement?
I do not have a direct answer for that, but I can give you a couple of possibilities.
1) They graduated from an establisned school from their home country. I am not saying xavier is a fraud, but it certainly is not a big school that is known around the world.
2) May be those people had to take the 90 units from a us-accredited college first before they were licensed.
3) Could be that they have connections in the hospitals and that connection allows them an easy entrance into residency. I know a lot of philiphino doctors would come to the states as nurse first and worked for couple of years. Once they got their license, they would apply for a job in the hospital they worked at. Due to an already established relationship with the staff, it is much easier for those pinoy docs to get a residency job.
There is one thing you must understand is that you have to make your resume look impressive when you apply for residency and a degree from a us-accredited school looks way better than a degree from some unknown caribbean university.
One thing for sure is skipping undergrad to go to an obscure caribbean university is very risky. The first thing you should do is finish your undergrad first because you want to us your undergrad education as a future predictor for your medical education. If you can not even make it out of undergrad alive, what do you think your success of passing all of the us-standardized board exams?

jasano
11-04-2007, 02:51 PM
The only reason i stated im not asian is because people were asking if i was and if my parents were forcing me to going to medical school early. I wasnt stating anything about discrimination. I think that medical schools do a very good job at not discriminating against anyone. For the most part, they discriminate against personality. If you are an honors student, but have the personality of a toilet seat, your not going to make a good doctor. Plain and simple. I know i wouldnt want to go into surgery with someone who has a bad attitude or cant carry on a conversation with me.

You asked for it. Personality is one of the biggest factors is it? Perhaps that's why in every country around the globe, post equity, affirmative action and positive discrimination, women make up 60% plus of the medical profession? Funny thing, but when those numbers were reversed, there was massive protest and quotas were instituted to increase the number of women at medical schools.

Opponents of quotas argued that merit should be the sole determinant of who is and is not selected and that men were naturally stronger candidates. Feminists and women's advocates argued that quotas were needed to balance the playing field irregardless. Now men are asking for quotas in medicine, and the feminists are arguing that the only consideration should be merit - women are naturally stronger candidates. ;)
http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/reprint/170/9/1385.pdf

No quotas don't exist according to my friend here. Well then, would somebody inform these schools that their policies are in need of some serious revision?

50.7 Entrance Quotas - GFC Policy Manual - University of Alberta (http://www.uofaweb.ualberta.ca/gfcpolicymanual/policymanualsection50-7.cfm)
(Alberta, Canada)

U of S: Medicine (http://explore.usask.ca/programs/nondirect/me/)
(Saskatchewan, Canada)

Ban Quota - Say No To Reservations (http://www.banquota.com/)
(India)


Wall Street Journal, November 16, 1998 by Ron K. Unz (http://www.onenation.org/1198/111698b.html)
(Harvard University, USA)

FutureMD46
11-04-2007, 09:26 PM
[User can't play nice]

jasano
11-05-2007, 12:59 PM
Wow! I see now what you mean about personality. Having worked in the medical field in the capacity of nurse for over 10 years, I can honestly say that someone with that kind of attitude has no basis for being a physician.

Actually, I haven't applied because I was unable to do so - the MCAt testing was reduced from 6000 to 3000 due to change over to computer exams and thus I was unable even to apply here. None of this has anything to do with me. We're talking about fairness and equality here. I may make it into med school, but there are many more who won't because of these policies. That's wrong and having a moral compass with which to guide my actions, I see that.







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