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eilrahcmi
07-31-2007, 11:21 AM
The admissions requirements state you only need 90 credit hours completed, so does that mean you do not need a degree in order to get accepted? I figure having a degree would look better than not having one, but would it greatly impact the decision of being accepted there? How hard is to to get accepted without a degree?

MDTOB
07-31-2007, 11:36 AM
The admissions requirements state you only need 90 credit hours completed, so does that mean you do not need a degree in order to get accepted? I figure having a degree would look better than not having one, but would it greatly impact the decision of being accepted there? How hard is to to get accepted without a degree?

I knew a lot of SMUer's that didn't have bachelor degrees. It's pretty much a personal preference. I would say, if age is not a factor, then get your bachelor's then apply.

azulpanther
07-31-2007, 12:06 PM
2 of my close friends came here with 90 credits and they were young, low 20's. They kicked butt in their courses. Its all up to you.

C-LAB
07-31-2007, 12:11 PM
I have a friend in 3rd semester now who doesn't have a degree. I don't know if SMU changed requirements for having a degree, but I do know that you have to take the MCAT now for admission

eilrahcmi
07-31-2007, 12:18 PM
so do you think its any harder to get accepted without a degree?

AmericanIMG
07-31-2007, 12:25 PM
if u have the grades and decent MCAT u should be ok w/ the 90credits IMO. you can always do the BBA/MBA dual degree w/ Davenport if you feel like you need one later.

gschneid
07-31-2007, 12:58 PM
I'd say get the bachelor's first just in case you find out down the road that medicine isn't for you. Then it's already done and you don't have to go back.

JTP73
07-31-2007, 01:20 PM
I'd say get the bachelor's first just in case you find out down the road that medicine isn't for you. Then it's already done and you don't have to go back.Why not consider the US schools? I say, if you're mature enough, skip the bachelor's and save money. Just make sure you don't come to Grand Cayman to hang at Upper Level (or whatever the place is called) impressing locals by buying expensive drinks for everyone, pretending you're wealthy, wasting your student loan money...

whataremychances
07-31-2007, 01:31 PM
The admissions requirements state you only need 90 credit hours completed, so does that mean you do not need a degree in order to get accepted? I figure having a degree would look better than not having one, but would it greatly impact the decision of being accepted there? How hard is to to get accepted without a degree?


I'm also thinking of applying w/o degree after completing 90 credits & I'll take MCAT. let's see what happens.

WAMC

drJane23
07-31-2007, 03:35 PM
but don't you think having a bachelors degree will make you more competitive. how about for residency..don't you think they will look at the fact that you never received a bachelors degree or does that not matter anymore. personally, i think you should get your bachelors degree but thats just my opinion. but of course, you do whatever you want ;)

MDTOB
07-31-2007, 04:11 PM
but don't you think having a bachelors degree will make you more competitive. how about for residency..don't you think they will look at the fact that you never received a bachelors degree or does that not matter anymore.

Bachelor's degree for Residency???? R u serious???

eilrahcmi
07-31-2007, 04:24 PM
do they look at your undergraduate history for that?

Diva
07-31-2007, 04:47 PM
I would have to agree with DrJane. Even though they dont look at your undergrad work. I would prefer to have one anyway....I think it makes you a well rounded person. By that I mean, you take 130+ credit of whatever, you have a degree plus at least 10 more classes than the person who doesnt have a degree. Its a matter of personal achievement.

Plus as the person who commented on this b4 said.....you have something to fall back on.
Further more, you can use the 40 extra credits to take advanced bio classes and figure out whether med school is for you, whether the subject comes easy to you, and whether you like it. And taking General biology doesn't count! Unless you go into Vet school.



On a side note, in reference to residency. The whole " I went to US school I'm better than you" attitude would prove true with the 90+ credit individuals. The US student will be better than you, they are required to have a BA/** degree.
Aren't we supposed to be proving to them that we are just the same? But yet they accept ppl w/o bacc degrees...***?????

XLNC
07-31-2007, 04:51 PM
I though a B.A or B.Sc was required for residency by most states

MDTOB
07-31-2007, 05:10 PM
I though a B.A or B.Sc was required for residency by most states

Then why would SMU admit students without undergraduate degrees???

JTP73
07-31-2007, 05:42 PM
I'll give you all of my undergrad and grad degrees for a mere $150K. I care little about these useless pieces of paper which will become even less valuable when I finish med school. But to get in, even at SMU, w/o a BA/**, it has been posted by the admin, that you will need to have stellar grades (whatever that means), which, of course, begs the question, why not apply to US schools?

XLNC
07-31-2007, 06:17 PM
Then why would SMU admit students without undergraduate degrees???

I dont think you understand..

How does SMU admission policy relate to residency criteria?

Jeep23Guy
07-31-2007, 06:35 PM
Many US schools allow students to enter without a BA/** if they have at least 90 credit hours. It's rare, but I went to college with 2 people that got in after their junior year.

I can't speak for every medical board, but most require either a BA/**, or at least 90 credit hours.

MD777
07-31-2007, 08:34 PM
when you apply a residency program, won't you have to demonstrate ALL the education/degrees/diploma received before obtaining the MD?

i think having a degree first before a med school would mean something to a patient, esp. for a mommy delivering a baby. that is my personal opinion. i would very much repsect an MD, who has already completed at least an undergraduate degree or even more.

AmericanIMG
07-31-2007, 11:04 PM
1 - no one cares about what you did in undergrad later in life. just like no one cares about what you did in HS. all that matters is the steps, LORs, licensure.
2 - you can say that you have the **/BA to fall back on, but failing can NOT be an option. what job will you get with your **/BA and tens of thousands (if not more) of loan debt???
3 - what you learn in undergrad means nothing in med school (unless you majored in phys/biochem/something crazy).
4 - if you get into med school w/o the **/BA save yourself time and money and get to work!

AmericanIMG
07-31-2007, 11:06 PM
i think having a degree first before a med school would mean something to a patient, esp. for a mommy delivering a baby. that is my personal opinion. i would very much repsect an MD, who has already completed at least an undergraduate degree or even more.

when was the last time that someone, while giving birth, asked the doctor where they went to undergrad? what about where they went to med school? no one cares, they just care if you are a good, caring doctor.
foreign born docs do the MBBS, and many of them are doctors in the US. they don't go to undergrad, they do from HS. they comprise a large amount of the workforce.

WSUCougar
08-01-2007, 12:48 AM
Plus as the person who commented on this b4 said.....you have something to fall back on.
Further more, you can use the 40 extra credits to take advanced bio classes and figure out whether med school is for you, whether the subject comes easy to you, and whether you like it.

Falling back on my Degrees were never an option. The last thing I wanted to do was pipet all day. US medical schools don't require bachelor degrees. Its published every year how many students they except with/without bachelor degrees. Although its rare not to have a bachelor, they do accept them. Undergrad is merely a weeding out process. What did I get out of the series of Physics (9.8 m/s = gravity) and that's it. What did I get out of Calculus ( Jack poop ). What did I get out the million Bio classes I took ( Darwin, Natural Selection, transcription, replication, translation. I minored in Biochemistry and took Anat and Phys merely to give me a better background for Medical School. (Which by the way lowered my gpa, since I took these hard "extra" classes and got me only 2 DO interviews out of 20. If I could do it over again, I'd major in Zoology and get a 4.0. You want to know if "Medicine" is for you. "work" in the field and find out for yourself. I've worked in the ER the past 3 years and I've been punched in the face by a drunk, barfed on numerous times, and I still love it. Helping and interacting with people is what will serve as your catalyst for becoming a doctor. The first time I did CPR on a patient that came back to life served as the nail in my coffin.


i think having a degree first before a med school would mean something to a patient, esp. for a mommy delivering a baby. that is my personal opinion. i would very much repsect an MD, who has already completed at least an undergraduate degree or even more.

"NO ONE CARES HOW MUCH YOU KNOW, UNTIL THEY KNOW HOW MUCH YOU CARE"

JTP73
08-01-2007, 08:33 AM
Falling back on my Degrees were never an option. The last thing I wanted to do was pipet all day. US medical schools don't require bachelor degrees. Its published every year how many students they except with/without bachelor degrees. Although its rare not to have a bachelor, they do accept them. Undergrad is merely a weeding out process. What did I get out of the series of Physics (9.8 m/s = gravity) and that's it. What did I get out of Calculus ( Jack poop ). What did I get out the million Bio classes I took ( Darwin, Natural Selection, transcription, replication, translation. I minored in Biochemistry and took Anat and Phys merely to give me a better background for Medical School. (Which by the way lowered my gpa, since I took these hard "extra" classes and got me only 2 DO interviews out of 20. If I could do it over again, I'd major in Zoology and get a 4.0. You want to know if "Medicine" is for you. "work" in the field and find out for yourself. I've worked in the ER the past 3 years and I've been punched in the face by a drunk, barfed on numerous times, and I still love it. Helping and interacting with people is what will serve as your catalyst for becoming a doctor. The first time I did CPR on a patient that came back to life served as the nail in my coffin.



"NO ONE CARES HOW MUCH YOU KNOW, UNTIL THEY KNOW HOW MUCH YOU CARE"
But hopefully not the pt's! ;)

mbergwal
08-01-2007, 09:02 AM
Falling back on my Degrees were never an option. The last thing I wanted to do was pipet all day. US medical schools don't require bachelor degrees. Its published every year how many students they except with/without bachelor degrees. Although its rare not to have a bachelor, they do accept them. Undergrad is merely a weeding out process. What did I get out of the series of Physics (9.8 m/s = gravity) and that's it. What did I get out of Calculus ( Jack poop ). What did I get out the million Bio classes I took ( Darwin, Natural Selection, transcription, replication, translation. I minored in Biochemistry and took Anat and Phys merely to give me a better background for Medical School. (Which by the way lowered my gpa, since I took these hard "extra" classes and got me only 2 DO interviews out of 20. If I could do it over again, I'd major in Zoology and get a 4.0. You want to know if "Medicine" is for you. "work" in the field and find out for yourself. I've worked in the ER the past 3 years and I've been punched in the face by a drunk, barfed on numerous times, and I still love it. Helping and interacting with people is what will serve as your catalyst for becoming a doctor. The first time I did CPR on a patient that came back to life served as the nail in my coffin.



"NO ONE CARES HOW MUCH YOU KNOW, UNTIL THEY KNOW HOW MUCH YOU CARE"

I can't wait until my first "drunk punch in the face", then I'll know I've arrived!! (I'll also accept being barfed on)

Diva
08-01-2007, 10:55 AM
Although its rare not to have a bachelor, they do accept them.

In all your medical career you will come across MAYBE 1 US grad w/o a Bacc degree. And many non-US grads w/o a degree. Get my point?


Undergrad is merely a weeding out process.

You said it your self, it is a weeding out process, where the storngest survive, but would you want someone who didnt "survive" to be sitting in class with you?
The next comment would be "Med school would weed them out" And yes, it will. But that brings me back to "having your degree to fall back on"

US schools accept ppl w/o bacc degrees, but that means that they are confident enough that this person could handle the rigors of med school. And they did their research on that person, and can put their money on them.
You think carib schools do the same? Lol...... then what are you going to fall back on? The 90 credits of undergrad? To even go for PA you would need to either start from scratch and take those "weeding out classes" which everyone keeps talking about...and see whether you can "survive".

So as I said b4........get a bacc degree and go on to the next step. Not everyone is Mensa material.



What did I get out of the series of Physics (9.8 m/s = gravity) and that's it. What did I get out of Calculus ( Jack poop ). What did I get out the million Bio classes I took ( Darwin, Natural Selection, transcription, replication, translation. I minored in Biochemistry and took Anat and Phys merely to give me a better background for Medical School. (Which by the way lowered my gpa, since I took these hard "extra" classes and got me only 2 DO interviews out of 20.


Isnt that exactly what I said? If it lowered your GPA that means you struggled with the class, or it was hard. Therefore, you are in a Carib school. Just like the rest of us.


You want to know if "Medicine" is for you. "work" in the field and find out for yourself. I've worked in the ER the past 3 years and I've been punched in the face by a drunk, barfed on numerous times, and I still love it. Helping and interacting with people is what will serve as your catalyst for becoming a doctor. The first time I did CPR on a patient that came back to life served as the nail in my coffin.

Good for you, that makes you better than some US students who have never been in a hospital, until their second yr of med school rolls around. Then they realize they hate pts and stupid ppl, but yet they are still MD's.
But working in a hosp will give you a glimpse of your future career. Which is great, but it wont help you pass your classes.
You develop study habits in college by taking all these "extra" hard classes.

Some ppl are idiots when it comes to pts...but they have great study habits.




Also, in reference to no one caring where you went to school or what degree you have.....you are wrong.
Not many ppl know this, unless you work in the industry, but when you start working, and you become a participating provider for insurance companies. For some you have to submit ALL your degrees. Some will not accept you as a par provider if you dont have the desired credentialing.
On the website where your patients go to look up your info, it says where you went to school, yes even your undergrad (Gasp!), as well as languages you speak, and your affiliation and resdency training.


So the moral of the story is.......go get your bacc degree and then go to med school. If you try to take a short cut you all ways get scewed where the sun dont shine.

drJane23
08-01-2007, 11:06 AM
totally agree with Diva. you are completely right!

WSUCougar
08-01-2007, 01:00 PM
Last thing I want to do is argue about this, because I'm on the side of you "SHOULD" get your bachelor degree. Fact of the matter is that if I took the basic classes and pre-reqs for Med School, I'd be in a US med school right now. But, I took those extra hard classes and took 5 Biochem classes to get my minor all under 3 years while working full-time. Rather than wait another year and take Post Bach classes I decided to go to SMU, which I am more than happy to do. I was just stating that "technically" you don't need your bachelor degree. My uncle is an MD, went to a Carib school without a bachelor degree and is a preferred provider for Premera Blue Cross, Blue Shield, First Choice, you name it.

When it comes down to it, I think that if you're going to a Carib school you should do everything possible to pad your MD degree i.e. get a bachelor degree. This is why I think the Davenport program is "VERY" good idea.







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