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st_55
10-02-2006, 11:57 AM
question: what is the difference between transferrin and ferritin levels?

howardhoavan
10-03-2006, 09:00 PM
transferrin

ferritin

jameslynton
10-03-2006, 09:19 PM
question: what is the difference between transferrin and ferritin levels?Good Question - Iron is transported in the plasma by transferrin - a protein that binds two molecules of ferritin and is stored inside the tissues inside molecules of ferritin. The large internal cavity (~80 A in diameter) of ferritin can hold as many as 4500 ferric ions. So these levels are indirect measures of the bodies stores of iron. These giant 90-kd molecules are controled by Ferritin mRNA which has a iron response element (IRE) - in times of low iron concentrations these molecules are not made. When iron (ferric ions increase) more are made. These are critical to the manufacture of heme in red blood cells and the cytochrome c cycles. Hope this helps - this is more Biochemistry that has effects on physiology...

MDiva
10-04-2006, 08:12 AM
Here's another take on the levels:

Transferrin is an iron transport protein. Clinical consideration: In the case of iron deficieny, transferrin levels will be high. Imagine a bunch of taxi cabs transporting a lot of people during rush hour. You can't catch a cab because none are available. However, after rush hour is over, there are available taxis everywhere because everyone is at work. No people, yet plenty of taxis around.

Ferritin is an iron storage protein. In the case of iron deficiency, ferritin levels will be low. Consider what Jameslynton posted before about the production of ferritin: low iron, no ferritin produced. So ferritin comes around on an 'as-needed' basis.

Bad_Dobby
10-04-2006, 08:15 PM
Good Points MDIVA. I like your use of taxi cabs waiting. Also remember these are more water soluable proteins and the iron is stored as iron oxide - hydroxide. Thus they are water soluable and their ability to move in the blood plasma - extracellular and intra celluar fluids. I would expect the only thing we have not covered is the transferrin receptor a membrane protein that binds the iron loaded transferrin and moves it inside the cell.

MDiva
10-06-2006, 08:45 AM
I would expect the only thing we have not covered is the transferrin receptor a membrane protein that binds the iron loaded transferrin and moves it inside the cell.


Thanks for your good insight, Bad Dobby :D

st_55
10-07-2006, 12:21 AM
thank you all for your explanations..it was very helpful:)







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