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DRJJ1
08-31-2006, 10:00 PM
I Know For Fact,,,my Buddy Is In A Mid East Coast State Doing A Residency Passded Step 1 2 And Doing Greatt,,,a Former Chiropractor As Well,,

Carmen
09-03-2006, 08:26 PM
You are lying. IUHS does not have a former chiropractor who has reached that stage of medical education.

Nice try though!

ULTRON
09-04-2006, 01:18 PM
He's right. I have seen a Iowa FP residency accept an IUHS grad who began residency in July 2006. I will not list his name on this forum though. Instead of calling someone a "liar" you should first listen to what they're saying. You'll be a good doctor only if you're a good listener.

Have a nice day.

ULTRON



You are lying. IUHS does not have a former chiropractor who has reached that stage of medical education.

Nice try though!

maximillian genossa
09-04-2006, 04:06 PM
I don't think any reasonable person should dispute the ability of any IUHS student who have used the online portion for basic sciences to get into residency. What seems to be confused here, as well as in the St. Chris forum is a bigger issue, LICENSING.

I do know for a fact, as well as Carmen knows, that there is one student who has almost completed residency and the same state where she is doing residency WILL NOT allow her to get a license. The same thing, most probably will happen with many other medical boards. I am not saying this person won't get a license, but I can say that doing residency DOES NOT GUARANTEE a license.

For more information, you can take a look at the explanation I left recently in the St. Christopher forum about week ago. To make it easier, below is the same explanation.

Max

Residency, less strict than licensing, requires a training license in most states, or training permit, or whatever the state wants to call it. Normally an ECFMG certificate and good reference letters can get you into one, depending on how competitive it is. You go through the hospital's program director and hiring committee and are granted a contract, renewable every year and you are disposable at any time if you are incompetent, a trouble maker, a bad team player or the hospital runs out of funds. Little state intervention at this point, unless you are a big screw-up, then you will have the State up to it's eye balls in your case. The hospital must ensure you are competent to the state. Otherwise, guy's that walk in suits and ties and have a J.D. will have a feast and the hospital will loose its funds, accreditation and probably will end up being an apartment complex. I know some states that let you do residency in it but won't license you.

Licensing, requires all of the above plus completion of a training period that varies from 2-5 years depending on specialty. States have the last say. You may have done residency at Mayo clinic, and if the State you are applying deems the school you graduated from no-good, you are done for in that state. Also you better have a clean criminal record, nothing pending, in some states, not even civil cases. Different states have different rules, we know about California, Texas, Oregon, Indiana, etc. More technicalities than this, I tried to keep it as simple as possible.

Accreditation, a government body recognizes the degrees of an institution as totally valid and equal to those offered in such jurisdiction. An accrediting body, like the Middle States of Colleges and Universities, for example, pays a visit to the school, evaluates it in and out (everything, facilities, finances, professorship qualifications, etc. you name it they do it) and renders a decision to accredit it, meaning it has a high standard or and acceptable standard of education. Meets or exceeds, deficiencies, they can conditionally accredit your school until improvements are done, or simply say, no. But they will tell you why you failed to get accredited. LCME schools. California does this (site visits)to all so called pseudo-American offshore medical schools, (Ross, AUC, St. Georges, and almost everyone in the Caribbean). To State (or Government)sponsored schools, they normally go through diplomatic protocol and most of the times, accept the degree since it is assumed the foreing government has certain quality control processes in place to ensure the quality of education. In other words, it is not a cash cow. Texas is doing the same thing, I need to verify this.

Recognition, meaning that a jurisdiction knows about your school through another governmental body or an evaluation agency such as IMED-FAIMER, ECFMG, WHO. Almost any school can get this, as long as the school has a valid charter (pay its dues) there is no quality control, or very little if any, or it is not guaranteed. Reason why you have so many private medical schools in the Caribbean and other places around the Globe.




I Know For Fact,,,my Buddy Is In A Mid East Coast State Doing A Residency Passded Step 1 2 And Doing Greatt,,,a Former Chiropractor As Well,,

Carmen
09-04-2006, 06:09 PM
I guarantee that this chiropractor did not do on-line pre-clinical education with IUHS. He possibly could have been a transfer student. He could be an advanced standing student, but will guarantee no licensing due to the fact that he would not be able to convert his chiropractor courses to medicine.

Sorry, but I am in contact with certain people at IUHS and this is false.

I agree, calling someone a "liar" was rude. I just become frustrated to see a person come on this forum singing the praises of IUHS when so many have suffered from this school's activities.

wisdom76
09-06-2006, 06:58 AM
I Know For Fact,,,my Buddy Is In A Mid East Coast State Doing A Residency Passded Step 1 2 And Doing Greatt,,,a Former Chiropractor As Well,,


If you read your post, it's easy to read your lies

drjohnwebb
09-06-2006, 07:28 AM
First of all, this chiropractor did not attend this school. He went to UHSA, got advanced standing for his chiro science classes, did a few online classes, did rotations he set up himself at a local hospital and got his degree. He didn't match, but somehow got a residency program to take him. He will be able to get a license, but not in many states. However, most states will grant you a license if you have been licensed in another state for X amount of years. Through the back door, long way, he may be able to practice in a lot of states.

More and more states are now COMPLETELY black listing ALL graduates of any school that offers online classes, even if you didn't take the online classes.

The balance will shift in the next few years. Either most states will NOT accept the online credits.. OR they will come to terms with the times and accept it fully. Remember this, Ross was bought by DeVry 2 years ago.. an ONLINE school. Even Johns Hopkins, Harvard and Yale, etc.. offer online courses and almost ALL states accept continuing ed that is completed online. The online universities are getting bigger and gaining credibility. Even elem. and high schools in California are letting 4000 students do all their courses online this year.

I personally like the traditional way of learning in a class room. I do believe that you can learn just as well at your computer, in most subjects. I also believe if you can pass the boards, who cares where you went to school and if you did it online.
The biggest obstacle is this.. Most MDs are thinking.. I had to sit in classes, you should have to sit in classes. The traditional people in medicine believe if it was hard and long for them, it should be the same for you. They want the next generation to do more, know more and endure more, even though they don't want to learn more or be required to do more continuing ed.

Just my two cents...

ULTRON
09-06-2006, 10:28 AM
My brother is at a Big 4 schools, and he says they get 1000s of MB of ppt and word docs a day (he took a special 4 giga USB key with him to the island). The prof. just stands there and reads all the material daily from 8-1 every day during which students tend to dose off. But when they come home/library, they hog on the ppt and word docs and study more effecively. Do I support online education? I'm not sure.

ULTRON

DRJJ1
09-06-2006, 09:39 PM
drjohn got it right,,so carmen don t call me a liar,,ok be nice

Carmen
09-07-2006, 07:37 AM
Sorry to call you a liar, but you did have your facts wrong. This person did not take the on-line IUHS program. I personally don't like the idea of on-line since I think there are so many deficiencies to it, but that is not my argument. My problem is the way that IUHS is doing it. If done properly, who knows?

Sorry to call you a liar - but I know every grad from IUHS and this guy is not one of them.

Carmen

DRJJ1
09-07-2006, 10:24 AM
But This Person Took The Online 3 Courses And Rest Was Transfer Credit Then Clinical Then Resid Now..how Do I Know? I Know The Person Personally.

ULTRON
09-07-2006, 11:31 AM
Personally, I don't see anything wrong with online basic science education. Why? My mom is a nurse, and do you know how docs "see" patients these days? On the phone!! My mom examines a patient and reports to the doc by the Internet, the sucker then sends a diagnosis through email. How does he diagnose? From his PDA for cryin out loud. And guess what? Some hospitals email X rays to docs in India who read it from there and reply through email. And then boards tell us that online education is bad. This is pathetic.

Carmen
09-07-2006, 02:12 PM
I am confused about the "online 3 courses". At IUHS, you must take a full 40 weeks of pre-clinical education on-line or on island. Did he take the blocks? Please ask your friend to write us a message. If IUHS was so great for him or her, I'm sure lots of us would want to hear about it.

This "friend" issue doesn't make sense. Why would you come to this forum to discuss a friend instead of this person?

Once again, I have spoken to many from IUHS and there has only been a few grads so far. I know of 3 that are in a residency and perhaps he or she wasn't identified as a chiropractor?

I would be happy to identify myself from a p.m. if your friend is willing. This argument is not pertaining to IUHS, but if this person indeed did graduate and obtain an residency.

Carmen

diogenes
09-07-2006, 03:39 PM
DRJJ1 himself said that "DrJohn got it right"- which I presume means getting it right about the chiro. going to UHSA, not IUHS.
By the way, Carmen, how long has IUHS been in business? I'm surprised that there are only a few grads. so far.

anencephalic
09-07-2006, 04:09 PM
Personally, I don't see anything wrong with online basic science education. Why? My mom is a nurse, and do you know how docs "see" patients these days? On the phone!! My mom examines a patient and reports to the doc by the Internet, the sucker then sends a diagnosis through email. How does he diagnose? From his PDA for cryin out loud. And guess what? Some hospitals email X rays to docs in India who read it from there and reply through email. And then boards tell us that online education is bad. This is pathetic.

This is because there is a HUGE difference between technology like teleradiology and telepathology (of which you mentioned in your post) and distance learning through correspondance schools via the internet (search for it as it's been discussed ad nauseum on VMD).

And for your mom's employer who is "diagnosing" patients he's not physically seeing and examining...I wonder how he's doing the billing and who's getting paid for techinical/professional component?

ULTRON
09-07-2006, 09:20 PM
I don't see much of a difference. If a radiologist in India/China is examining US patient XRays through the Internet, why can't a basic science student learn off the Internet? At most schools basic sciences are nothing but word docs and ppt which the professor reads in front of the class - which is half asleep. And whats more? To become a radiologist you need 10 years (4 for MD + 6 residency) of training. So basically you're spending 2 out of 10 years online ~ 20% of your overall training is online. Then 100% of your career is online. So, I don't see anything wrong with online stuff - even though its banned in most states. What do you say?

ULTRON



This is because there is a HUGE difference between technology like teleradiology and telepathology (of which you mentioned in your post) and distance learning through correspondance schools via the internet (search for it as it's been discussed ad nauseum on VMD).

And for your mom's employer who is "diagnosing" patients he's not physically seeing and examining...I wonder how he's doing the billing and who's getting paid for techinical/professional component?

DRJJ1
09-07-2006, 09:29 PM
LETS stop here im not getting into this any further,,no names got it,,,thanks for your understanding,,why? cause the person doesn t need to bothered with emails and calls,,,carry on

anencephalic
09-07-2006, 09:49 PM
I don't see much of a difference. If a radiologist in India/China is examining US patient XRays through the Internet, why can't a basic science student learn off the Internet? At most schools basic sciences are nothing but word docs and ppt which the professor reads in front of the class - which is half asleep. And whats more? To become a radiologist you need 10 years (4 for MD + 6 residency) of training. So basically you're spending 2 out of 10 years online ~ 20% of your overall training is online. Then 100% of your career is online. So, I don't see anything wrong with online stuff - even though its banned in most states. What do you say?

ULTRON

State medical licensing boards unfortunately do not see things quite your way. It's not a matter of right or wrong. There's the issue of charter and the ability (or lack thereof) to gain an unrestricted license to practice medicine. You don't have to take my word for it.

ULTRON
09-07-2006, 11:50 PM
But you have a point. If doing medical school becomes as easy as logging into a computer every day from you bedroom in your pyjamas, every Tom **** and Harry would become docs - just as every Tom **** and Harry became engineers (and I was forced to lose my engineering career to someone in Taiwan). Now thats a frightening situation. The US boards should really tighten their grip on foreign docs but thats just my opinion.

maximillian genossa
09-08-2006, 10:29 AM
...to the extent that you seem to forget that you still have to pass board tests ,complete clinicals and do residency before even dreaming of becomming a full fledge physician. So, given the fact that a person can complete this rigurous training (clinicals and residency, after passing the boards) I don't see the big issue. After you have passed residency and all the boards you are proving to have attained certain level of proficiency regardless on how you did your basic sciences equally compared to those who atended basic sciences the traditional way. I don't see how you can prove me wrong on this side of the argument.

Just to clarify, I am not endorsing IUHS nor UHSA or their business practices in no means, explicit or implicit. OK?

Max



But you have a point. If doing medical school becomes as easy as logging into a computer every day from you bedroom in your pyjamas, every Tom **** and Harry would become docs - just as every Tom **** and Harry became engineers (and I was forced to lose my engineering career to someone in Taiwan). Now thats a frightening situation. The US boards should really tighten their grip on foreign docs but thats just my opinion.

ULTRON
09-08-2006, 04:23 PM
Good reply Max. Here's another news link to why distant learning technology is playing an active role in medicine:

Listen to the Doctor . . . on Your iPod




Tuesday, August 22, 2006; Page HE02

Over the past year, health providers, medical journals, government agencies and a bewildering number of self-proclaimed health experts have begun to offer health news and information via audio and video podcasts. These prerecorded segments are downloaded from the Internet and played on a computer or other device. A variety of software allows you to subscribe -- often for free -- to podcasts and receive automatic updates. Catch up on, say, the latest Parkinson's disease research while at your desk or the dangers of heat stroke during your morning run.


Listen to the Doctor . . . on Your iPod (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/21/AR2006082101091.html)


...to the extent that you seem to forget that you still have to pass board tests ,complete clinicals and do residency before even dreaming of becomming a full fledge physician. So, given the fact that a person can complete this rigurous training (clinicals and residency, after passing the boards) I don't see the big issue. After you have passed residency and all the boards you are proving to have attained certain level of proficiency regardless on how you did your basic sciences equally compared to those who atended basic sciences the traditional way. I don't see how you can prove me wrong on this side of the argument.

Just to clarify, I am not endorsing IUHS nor UHSA or their business practices in no means, explicit or implicit. OK?

Max

DocKao
09-09-2006, 11:50 AM
I know who this Chiropractor who got his MD from Antigua is and where he is practicing. I have talked to the clinics where he practiced. Got residency in Waterloo, IA in family practice and now is practicing in Iowa. It can happen and often happens to the people who believe it can. There are ways to get your MD degree and that doesn't make you a bad on or good one. I have seen the smartest people not make it in practice.... and that's what it's all about isn't it? Taking care of patients....NOT where you came from!

Side note: The patients loved this doctor with the on-line education

DocKao
09-09-2006, 11:51 AM
I know who this Chiropractor who got his MD from Antigua is and where he is practicing. I have talked to the clinics where he practiced. Got residency in Waterloo, IA in family practice and now is practicing in Iowa. It can happen and often happens to the people who believe it can. There are ways to get your MD degree and that doesn't make you a bad one or good one. I have seen the smartest people not make it in practice.... and that's what it's all about isn't it? Taking care of patients....NOT where you came from!

Side note: The patients loved this doctor with the on-line education

Carmen
09-09-2006, 12:16 PM
Did this doc to pre-clinical sciences online?

Carmen
09-09-2006, 12:30 PM
Further to this.... I am glad this worked out for this chiropractor, but I think the focus of this forum is IUHS.

Having seen a "traditional" medical school and knowing all of the activities undertaken in labs, etc. I personally don't believe that on-line education offers as thorough of an education as in-class, but who knows what the future will hold? I can tell you, though, that the way IUHS is teaching, the students at this school are not receiving a satisfactory medical education.

We all read about doctors who are negligent, etc. and I fear that IUHS may be producing some similar doctors. I was told a story by one of the admin people there that they had a vet doing on-line education. When he went on to clinicals, complaints were received because he couldn't do proper doctor-patient interviews (he was used to animals, ha ha). This does provide the point though that these students are not receiving needed skills.

Carmen

maximillian genossa
09-09-2006, 03:16 PM
Carmen as much as I would like to agree with you, you do not expect any reasonable person to assume that because one inept student it means that the entire program does not work. Your ending statement , pardon my bluntness, is totally ignorant. "This does provide the point though that these students are not receiving needed skills. " No, it does not prove that, it only proves this student was incompetent. How about the students that are in residency or the rest of the students in clinicals? Do you have that supporting data?

Can you provide more testimony from your insiders of more cases of students unable to perform their duties in clinicals?

Just curious, such a bold statement woke up my curiosity.





Further to this.... I am glad this worked out for this chiropractor, but I think the focus of this forum is IUHS.

Having seen a "traditional" medical school and knowing all of the activities undertaken in labs, etc. I personally don't believe that on-line education offers as thorough of an education as in-class, but who knows what the future will hold? I can tell you, though, that the way IUHS is teaching, the students at this school are not receiving a satisfactory medical education.

We all read about doctors who are negligent, etc. and I fear that IUHS may be producing some similar doctors. I was told a story by one of the admin people there that they had a vet doing on-line education. When he went on to clinicals, complaints were received because he couldn't do proper doctor-patient interviews (he was used to animals, ha ha). This does provide the point though that these students are not receiving needed skills.

Carmen

Carmen
09-09-2006, 09:20 PM
Yes, there are several of the IUHS students having problems in clinicals. I don't currently have any numbers, but think I could obtain the information. This is not because they aren't intelligent people, but due to lacking in some fundimental issues. The vet issue is one of and sadly this is true for several students. It is not the vet's fault, but that of the school for not 1) ever meeting the student and 2) not identifying any academic or scholarly deficiencies, 3) and not even addressing these issues. A doctor must be able to communicate effectively with his or her patients.

There is a long list of medical issues not addressed by IUHS: history taking, doctor-patient relations, cultural and gender issues, basic clinical skills, etc. Some students have come from a chiropractic, osteopathic, nursing, etc. background and have their own experience to help them in this area, but some students do not. Most of the students who are having problems are not included in these professions and need help. So far, many students have failed the USMLE part I and have not even had the opportunity to do a clinical. If a student fails this particular exam more than 3 times, there appears to be a problem with their education. I also feel it is unfair for IUHS to tell potential students that they can work full-time and study medicine. There are always some who can manage this, but I certainly wouldn't be one!

My point is that it is not fair to these students who are paying a great deal of money to earn a M.D. Certainly some can make it in this environment, but not all.

Don't mean to sound ignorant - I am speaking the truth.

Carmen

DRJJ1
09-09-2006, 09:57 PM
again,,the person got everything transferred but 3 courses,,,pharm, diag, and path I think it was done at uhsa,,in paid resid now,,

maximillian genossa
09-10-2006, 01:59 PM
I don't doubt you are speaking the truth, it is the way you presented your ending statement what intrigues me. We know the school is totally mismanaged and there is lack of supervision left and right, but on the same token there are some students doing well, these students may be the minority but it is something that has to be looked at more closely, not superficially.

That people chhose to spend their money with IUHS, is their choice, their responsibility, their money. They are doing it on free will, not at gunpoint. Maybe to cut corners, maybe not. We have to live with that. If at the end it results that they realize it was a waste of time and money, hey, they were told, at least in these forums.

In the end, it is more a personal choice than anything else.

Max




Yes, there are several of the IUHS students having problems in clinicals. I don't currently have any numbers, but think I could obtain the information. This is not because they aren't intelligent people, but due to lacking in some fundimental issues. The vet issue is one of and sadly this is true for several students. It is not the vet's fault, but that of the school for not 1) ever meeting the student and 2) not identifying any academic or scholarly deficiencies, 3) and not even addressing these issues. A doctor must be able to communicate effectively with his or her patients.

There is a long list of medical issues not addressed by IUHS: history taking, doctor-patient relations, cultural and gender issues, basic clinical skills, etc. Some students have come from a chiropractic, osteopathic, nursing, etc. background and have their own experience to help them in this area, but some students do not. Most of the students who are having problems are not included in these professions and need help. So far, many students have failed the USMLE part I and have not even had the opportunity to do a clinical. If a student fails this particular exam more than 3 times, there appears to be a problem with their education. I also feel it is unfair for IUHS to tell potential students that they can work full-time and study medicine. There are always some who can manage this, but I certainly wouldn't be one!

My point is that it is not fair to these students who are paying a great deal of money to earn a M.D. Certainly some can make it in this environment, but not all.

Don't mean to sound ignorant - I am speaking the truth.

Carmen

Carmen
09-10-2006, 06:38 PM
You are right Max. My hope has always been that those who are thinking of entering IUHS might change their mind when they see what other's experience has been.

Do your or anyone else know if IUHS is the only internet school? I went to the UHSA website, but couldn't determine if they offered on-line learning. There was a school in Australia offering on-line education, but if my memory serves me right, there was some type of problem.

Please let me know if anyone knows of other on-line schools. If there is, perhaps we can see how their students have fared in the licensing issue.

anatomy_guy
09-13-2006, 11:48 AM
You are right Max. My hope has always been that those who are thinking of entering IUHS might change their mind when they see what other's experience has been.

Do your or anyone else know if IUHS is the only internet school? I went to the UHSA website, but couldn't determine if they offered on-line learning. There was a school in Australia offering on-line education, but if my memory serves me right, there was some type of problem.

Please let me know if anyone knows of other on-line schools. If there is, perhaps we can see how their students have fared in the licensing issue.

The school is based out of Samoa and used the medical school curriculum from the University of melbourne. An entrepreneurial physician bought the curriculum and course content from the University of Melbourne and immediately set up a medical education computer company to translate the course contents onto a learning management system. He then had to find a friendly place to set up his medical school. Obviously the medical school needed accreditation and the Samoan government gave him legitimacy. How is Oceania better than IUHS?
The curriculum is based on the University of Melbourne Medical School program, which has been accredited in Australia. However this does NOT mean that the Oceania University of Medicine program is accredited by the Australian authorities. Thus legitimacy is questionable.
There is a residential pre-med preparatory program held at one of two colleges to ensure all students are up to snuff and start the program on equal footing. This is a good way to ensure that students are ready for the progam and have an appropriate level of preparatory education.
Problems: There is no residential component to ensure students have proper training in the clinical skills and are on the "same page". Also, having clinical or physician preceptors does NOT ensure that students are receiving the appropriate and complete clinical skill training required for clerkships.
There are also no procedures in place to ensure proper testing or examing of students at regular intervals, i.e. the end of block exams. There should be a contract with a company like Prometric to ensure exams are administered and graded independently in an environment that is supervised to not allow cheating or corruption of the exam. This increases the validity and respectability of the examination process.
Food for thought!
Cheers, A_G:)

StodeMD
09-13-2006, 01:10 PM
Have you guys ever imagined the "online" student having several of his friends or wive(s) :-D helping him complete his onlilne work? Who can stop that, am I right?

Then, he goes to clinicals, has no confidence ( I sure as heck wouldn't) gained by being in a "real" medical school, no clinical advisor to help him to navigate and know how to behave himself in his clerkships, little or no support from fellow students, no wonder he or she fails clinicals.

Just one DC not taking the online way, after having thoroughly investigated it. I know this is abotu IUHS, which I actually know nothing about. But UHSA says they have REAL people their taking traditional courses, has anyone ever witnessed that?

This post started with DRJJ1 saying he knew one Resident from IUHS. One? That's kinda scarey. There's a reason most people dont' go that route, it's common sense. I have talked with grads from online programs, and they get no help from teh school to pass USMLE, don't get prepped in testing during basic sciences with USMLE like testing, and have a real rough time, 98% don't have the tenacity to do it.

It is really weird, when you see it in context, to have a thread abotu the one known resident from IUHS.

WHY TORTURE YOURSELF IN THIS WAY, TO MAYBE GET A LICENCE?

Again, after all my investigation, and the 40 months and money I am going to put into it (Which by the way UHSA costs about the same as the lower big 4), I will not risk NOT GETTING LICENCED, as Genossa Max has said.

Anyone wanting to know more should search Genossa Max and Picard and rrod posts, they are good people who have posted a lot of good knowledge about all this.

SORRY i am a little off topic. I am not bashing any school or person either, it just seems like needless self torture.

Hope it helps.

Ps. These people who say "they know..such and such about..so and so" always come across to me as School Owners or School Administrators.
eeeeek.

Oh Lord, I hope this helps someone.

lovebug
03-24-2008, 04:06 PM
I just found the following link. Anyone from US who is considering OUM MUST look at it and then MUST contact state boards themselves either via email or phone and get first-hand information from the state boards themselves regarding online component in medical education and whether they will give license to someone whose MD program included online basic science curriculum. OUM for some reason is unable to provide information regarding states which would give license to OUM grads.

It is important to be aware that being able to take USMLE exams and then doing residency in the US does NOT mean you will get licensed to practice medicine in the states!! Everyone needs to understand this clearly before considering OUM. It appears to be a great curriculum and PBL sounds very good for self-motivated people. But IMO anyone who wants to practice medicine in US MUST contact all state boards themselves and confirm whether they will be able to practice medicine after residency if their MD is from OUM that has online basic science curriculum. Good luck and please post your responses from state boards so that it will be useful to others.

If you dont already know, state of California is VERY opposed to OUM or any other MD program with any online component so OUM grads will never be able to get licensed in CA. And if CA does not approve then there are other states that simply follow CA rules and so you wont be able to get licensed in those states either. These include OR, NM, GA,WA, etc

Make sure you ask the states specifically about online component and licensing rules of the state in regards to online component because many states may simply say that they will approve as long as its ECFMG certified BUT when you actually apply, they might object because there is online component in your MD degree. So everyone should contact individual states themselves and be VERY CLEAR on ALL the DETAILS and discuss EVERYTHING about the OUM curriculum in detail with the medical board.

oops i dont have enough posts so its not allowing me to post links here but for those who want to explore...the post is on the valueMD website under state licensing requirements, online classes and state licensure posted by neilc.

maximillian genossa
03-24-2008, 11:04 PM
Nice update, if you check this website and threads you will notice we have been saying the same since 2003 and before that since 2000 under the Network 54. That has not deterred people from attending the school and there are in fact a few that have obtained licenses in what IUHS or OUM (???) call "flexible" states. I am not against distance learning, but are not 100% for it either. It has to be done responsibly and with a degree of accountability. Don't get me wrong but the way some of these schools use it is sort of ???? if you know what I mean. That per se does not make the residents incompetent,otherwise we would have found out by now. And if few have obtained licenses, good for them, their states must have seen something we don't see, something neither you or myself are in a position to judge. About Neilc, well, he was banned permanently for having multiple accounts, go figure.:cool:





I just found the following link. Anyone from US who is considering OUM MUST look at it and then MUST contact state boards themselves either via email or phone and get first-hand information from the state boards themselves regarding online component in medical education and whether they will give license to someone whose MD program included online basic science curriculum. OUM for some reason is unable to provide information regarding states which would give license to OUM grads.

It is important to be aware that being able to take USMLE exams and then doing residency in the US does NOT mean you will get licensed to practice medicine in the states!! Everyone needs to understand this clearly before considering OUM. It appears to be a great curriculum and PBL sounds very good for self-motivated people. But IMO anyone who wants to practice medicine in US MUST contact all state boards themselves and confirm whether they will be able to practice medicine after residency if their MD is from OUM that has online basic science curriculum. Good luck and please post your responses from state boards so that it will be useful to others.

If you dont already know, state of California is VERY opposed to OUM or any other MD program with any online component so OUM grads will never be able to get licensed in CA. And if CA does not approve then there are other states that simply follow CA rules and so you wont be able to get licensed in those states either. These include OR, NM, GA,WA, etc

Make sure you ask the states specifically about online component and licensing rules of the state in regards to online component because many states may simply say that they will approve as long as its ECFMG certified BUT when you actually apply, they might object because there is online component in your MD degree. So everyone should contact individual states themselves and be VERY CLEAR on ALL the DETAILS and discuss EVERYTHING about the OUM curriculum in detail with the medical board.

oops i dont have enough posts so its not allowing me to post links here but for those who want to explore...the post is on the valueMD website under state licensing requirements, online classes and state licensure posted by neilc.

lolli
03-29-2008, 05:41 PM
Do you know what states are considered "flexible"??

Plz post if you have info about states that will accept grads from those schools for licensure!?

As far as I know, there are no states in the US that will accept them. However, the only states I dont know about are WY, Montana, ID, Hawaii, Virgin Islands...maybe these are the only states where they can practice?;)

maximillian genossa
03-29-2008, 07:41 PM
Do you know what states are considered "flexible"??

Plz post if you have info about states that will accept grads from those schools for licensure!?

As far as I know, there are no states in the US that will accept them. However, the only states I dont know about are WY, Montana, ID, Hawaii, Virgin Islands...maybe these are the only states where they can practice?;)


I just enjoy postings like yours that say "there are no states in the US that will accept them" . I personally know 3 of them, licensed grads, but since I just know them decided to drop a line, oh and no , they are not in the states you mentioned, still cold. However I take notice of your comment...."as far as I know" an assumption right away. Aren't you the same person who got banned a few days ago (lovebug) and just opened a new account? Just curious. :cool:

cdm1106
03-31-2008, 05:07 PM
Just wanted to give a some positive light to IUHS, I am a 1st year student, I have a masters degress, bachelors degree, and even an associates. but i recieved no "advanced standing" I started in block 1 just like everyone else. I know there is alot of concern about licensing in the US, I have found 5 states who are not currently excepting IUHS degrees, hopefully that will change with more graduates. I have talked with genossa maximillian via email, before I started the program, gm was straight forward about, so I knew the risks of some states not accepting IUHS, but most due. As for the televideo conferancing portion of the distant learning process, as I understand it quite a few US medical school have some of their lectures online, where students can review and montior the lectures that way. I will agree that the televideo aspect will make some portions of school challenging, especially gross anatomy, IUHS is using netters anatomy which is an excellent resource, but still lacking versus the human cadaveor. fortunately I can attend autopsies and cadaver labs at my hospital and local university. but the lectures are intense, reviewing much of the same information as the US medcial schools, right now we are enduring micro, immunology, anatomy, pharmacology and etc. People really shouldn't judge so quickly, I have been working in healthcare for 17 years now and still am amazed at some of the attitudes of superiority by some people. IMG's take the same exams as the US schools, which is what is required of any MD. I have know IMG's who were very brilliant and US MD's who I can't believe have a license and vice versa as well.
So don't be quick to judge, methods of learning have evolved. Guess I will see as my education continues.

mike007
04-06-2008, 02:06 PM
hi dude,

u r really brave to have enrolled in IUHS, given that der is so much negativity about IUHS. Are you in their distance learning or on-campus program.

Do you know if FL, AZ and TX will grant their DLP graduates a licensed after residency? Any help much appreciated. Thanks.

iaustudent06
04-07-2008, 07:21 AM
hi dude,

u r really brave to have enrolled in IUHS, given that der is so much negativity about IUHS. Are you in their distance learning or on-campus program.

Do you know if FL, AZ and TX will grant their DLP graduates a licensed after residency? Any help much appreciated. Thanks.

Texas will not at this point, feel free to read the 30 forums required for a school not on the approved list that will have to be filled out with all requirements met, specifically Form J and Forum Z1-Z7.
Additional Licensure Forms (http://www.tmb.state.tx.us/professionals/physicians/applicants/licforms.php)







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