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swosu98
07-12-2006, 01:20 PM
Hello Err-Body, I am looking for a good source or website to learn about the heart murmurs.. I tried learning it out of first aid but Its nothing but jargon to me. I would like to understand what they are talking about b/c everytime I do a board ? on 'em i get them wrong.. any help would be appreciated.. thank you.

wcb22
07-12-2006, 06:14 PM
http://www.med.ucla.edu/wilkes/inex.htm

you can hear some heart sounds at this website.

they are abstract concepts. keep reviewing them, go over the heart sounds (along with that diagram from FA, you know what i'm talking about, right?).

md90
07-14-2006, 12:27 AM
wcb22.. great minds think alike.. just posted the same site on a different thread; the site is good not only for the murmurs but the normal... ENJOY!

Future MD | DM erutuF
06-03-2007, 04:54 PM
A-S-S

Aortic valve - systolic murmur - is a STENOTIC valve.

THen u can figure out everything else from this. I'm not sure if this is what u were looking for but I hope this helps.

Dr. X
06-04-2007, 08:51 AM
since we're on the subject, i caught an error in the FA diagram, pg. 231.

Pulmonic stenosis: should be systolic murmur. I try to understand the way it works which is much more useful but could be time consuming if randomly asked.. so i used lil visual help as well:

- write down in big letters A P T M above the circles.
- between P and T draw a circle (not with black pen). At the end of line from "left sternal border".

- inside the circle A and P write "S" for stenosis and systolic
- new circle between A and P write "R/D" for both of A+P regurgitation/Diastolic

- inside T and M - write "S" and "R" together - only useful for location of murmur.

I make one disease favorite (most of the time, the common one) than the other, and associate findings with it. For ex., VSD with systolic and Tri. Regurgitation. Then you know the other one being opposite of this.

I also saw another error on pg. 230

5 year old boy presents with "diastolic" (not systolic) murmur and wide, fixed split S2 -- Dx being ASD. the diagram on 231 concurs.

I caught these errors myself so if anyone feels that i made a mistake or got it confused, help me... an explanation would be splendid. you can also validate that theyre errors.. whynot. If anyone requires explanation, i got no problem but gonna have to wait til next day tea break.. :)

k.. my tea is almost done.. getting back to resp. physio..

Water
09-30-2007, 11:17 PM
Murmur is caused by blood passing through a narrow passage.
The following is for left ventricle, one can interprete the right in the same manner
During systole, left ventricle contracts. Bloot squirts out. Two possible places (generally speaking) are the supposedly open aortic opening and the supposedly closed mitral opening. If mitral opens and cause the noise than mitral regurg. If aortic valves not open completely, then aortic stenosis.

During diastole, left ventricle is relaxing and getting a new load. The blood can enter the ventricle from either the supposedly closed aortic opening and supposedly open mitral opening. If a murmur is heard, that means either the blood is from the aortic opening due to aortic regurge or mitral restriction blood (stenosis).
To distiguish the difference between the two areas you have to use other information such as hypertrophy, blood pressure, cardiac output, peripheral edema, pulmonary edema, etc.

benevolo
11-11-2010, 03:55 PM
Murmur is caused by blood passing through a narrow passage.
The following is for left ventricle, one can interprete the right in the same manner
During systole, left ventricle contracts. Bloot squirts out. Two possible places (generally speaking) are the supposedly open aortic opening and the supposedly closed mitral opening. If mitral opens and cause the noise than mitral regurg. If aortic valves not open completely, then aortic stenosis.

During diastole, left ventricle is relaxing and getting a new load. The blood can enter the ventricle from either the supposedly closed aortic opening and supposedly open mitral opening. If a murmur is heard, that means either the blood is from the aortic opening due to aortic regurge or mitral restriction blood (stenosis).
To distiguish the difference between the two areas you have to use other information such as hypertrophy, blood pressure, cardiac output, peripheral edema, pulmonary edema, etc.

+1 for this guy. No offense to the others, but if you're trying to learn heart murmurs or any topic in medicine by memorizing charts and mnemonics rather than understanding the concepts, then you will have a VERY hard time succeeding. The only exception are in areas where you have no choice like learning drug names, the bugs in microbiology etc.

Unloading
11-29-2011, 10:51 AM
Murmurs are hard!!! thanks for the help

shilpakary
09-26-2012, 11:37 AM
hey i too had lot of confusion about murmurs....i have understud it better when i read everything about it in wiki.....u too try it..might help:D

ALLCARDIOLOGY
06-10-2014, 11:58 AM
Yea so many murmur questions

Med_Data
01-31-2017, 01:19 PM
Please check out the USMLE Step 1 Forum to express your opinion and help future medical students!







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