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Scott1981
04-08-2006, 09:16 AM
i found a SC surgery grad on the internet. he is a fifth year surgical resident at U of tenn.
http://gsm.utmck.edu/residents/main.cfm
navigate to the letter "O" section.

what im wondering is that he would have graduated SC in 2001 and started the school in 1997. unless he is a transfer student, was the school even around then? what was the "charter" status back in 1997? how about 2001 when he graduated even if he was a transfer student?

the bottom line, im 100% sure he is light years more than qualified for the job to land that residency in a university. i think he is probably really lucky because he most likely already has his license by now.

teratos
04-08-2006, 10:22 AM
He has been brought up numerous times. Poor guy was the end arguement of a lot of "can SC get you a residency" threads. I'm glad he's finishing up. He must have started some place else, since SC hasn't been around long enough for him to have started there. I just did a search of state medical boards. He didn't come up. I'm not sure if TN is on there. Not unusual, you don't really NEED a license until you are done residency. G

Picard
04-08-2006, 10:24 AM
i think he is probably really lucky because he most likely already has his license by now.
There were quite a bit of discussions about his difficulties in seeking licensure a while back. According to TN medical board, he is not currently licensed in TN at this time. And with TN now adopting the California list, he may not be able to get licensed in TN anymore. Not quite sure how this will impact his residency and board exam. In surgery, you must be appointed as a "Chief Resident" in order to graduate. Merely being a PGY-5 does not satisfy this requirement. I know several PGY-6 and PGY-7 surgery residents that had to stay over because they were not appointed as "Chief Residents." Chief surgical residents are consider junior faculty, and in many programs, require a permenent licensure to practice medicine in that state. Plus, permenent licensure may be a requirement to be board certified.

As for Dr. M.O., he took off a year for "research" (something that is not always by choice in a surgical residency). There has been talk of him been in the "application process" for various states since 2003-2004-ish.

P

Scott1981
04-08-2006, 10:24 AM
He has been brought up numerous times. Poor guy was the end arguement of a lot of "can SC get you a residency" threads. I'm glad he's finishing up. He must have started some place else, since SC hasn't been around long enough for him to have started there. G

my bad, i didnt know it was already discussed.

his situation is almost 180 degrees different than what the current students are facing. he probably already has his license by now. however, im having a problem looking him up. he doesnt have a license in tenn and he is listed as a doc at cleveland clinic ohio. when i went to look up a license in ohio, it shows that he had a training license there, but it is now inactive and expired since 2004. why a training license in ohio if he is doing residency in tenn?

teratos
04-08-2006, 10:34 AM
my bad, i didnt know it was already discussed.

his situation is almost 180 degrees different than what the current students are facing. he probably already has his license by now.
No, he doesn't seem to. Getting a training license for residency and getting an unrestricted license are 2 entirely different things. It is theoretically possible that one could finish a residency and become board certified and be unable to get licensed. G

Picard
04-08-2006, 10:35 AM
Can't find him licensed in TN or anywhere that were discussed earlier.

If he's not licensed in TN by now, he probably won't be since TN went to the California list... unless he gets grandfathered-in somehow if he started the process before the change.

P

Scott1981
04-08-2006, 10:42 AM
Can't find him licensed in TN or anywhere that were discussed earlier.

If he's not licensed in TN by now, he probably won't be since TN went to the California list... unless he gets grandfathered-in somehow if he started the process before the change.

P

i added stuff to my previous post. he had a training license in ohio which expired in 2004 and it now inactive. why ohio? never did residency there.

i checked out wisconsin, his home state...... and still no license there.

maybe he is having problems now getting a license. he should have had one somewhere by now.

Tritonesub
04-08-2006, 12:38 PM
No, he doesn't seem to. Getting a training license for residency and getting an unrestricted license are 2 entirely different things. It is theoretically possible that one could finish a residency and become board certified and be unable to get licensed. G

If you have a training license in a state, all you have to do is submit completion of the required years of GME and completion of step 3. You do not need to be board certified in anything. You also do not have to re-submit paperwork regarding previous education. You are automatically upgraded to full license from training once you submit proof of the above without the need for a review process. Thus you can be fully licensed and still in residency without being board certified. It is common place for many physicians to apply for license in many states in which they've never been to or have desire to work in. However, some do require proof of residence within a state or proof of a job contract in order to obtain license.

Why is it that so many here tend to talk about licensure when they dont even understand the process?

Miklos
04-08-2006, 12:49 PM
If you have a training license in a state, all you have to do is submit completion of the required years of GME and completion of step 3. You do not need to be board certified in anything. You also do not have to re-submit paperwork regarding previous education. You are automatically upgraded to full license from training once you submit proof of the above without the need for a review process. Thus you can be fully licensed and still in residency without being board certified. It is common place for many physicians to apply for license in many states in which they've never been to or have desire to work in. However, some do require proof of residence within a state or proof of a job contract in order to obtain license.

Why is it that so many here tend to talk about licensure when they dont even understand the process?
Not quite.

It all depends on the state. Some states issue training licenses that use this model, others do not (or minimally) regulate residents and leave this to the programs.

See http://www.fsmb.org/pdf/1996_grpol_Phys_Enrolled_Postgrad_Training_Program s.pdf

Admittedly an old document, but nevertheless leads insight into the processes followed by different states.

(Also full licensure as picard mentioned above may be a requirement to becoming BC'd, not the other way around.)

teratos
04-08-2006, 02:05 PM
If you have a training license in a state, all you have to do is submit completion of the required years of GME and completion of step 3. You do not need to be board certified in anything. You also do not have to re-submit paperwork regarding previous education.
Not true. When I applied for my MD license I had to start at the beginning. I had a training license in MD, but that never came into the equation




Why is it that so many here tend to talk about licensure when they dont even understand the process?
I might ask the same thing. Plug my name into the search engine on www.docboard.org (http://www.docboard.org) and you will find me. I am board certified and have been in practice for 3 years. My MD license number is D0059914.

BTW, I never said anything about NEEDING to be board certified, all I said was it was theoretically possible to be be board certified and still not be able to get a license anywhere. G

Picard
04-08-2006, 02:16 PM
If you have a training license in a state, all you have to do is submit completion of the required years of GME and completion of step 3. You do not need to be board certified in anything. You also do not have to re-submit paperwork regarding previous education. You are automatically upgraded to full license from training once you submit proof of the above without the need for a review process.

This is not true anymore in majority of states. For USMG's, yes, upgrading from training to permenent licensure had been merely a formality. But with the advent of IMG's "flooding" the system, this is no longer the case in most states. In many states, training license is nothing more than a "registration" submitted by the training program. Many states do not even have a formal training license program. And in most states nowadays, you need to submit the full licensing application all over again to "upgrade." I personally know many IMG"s with "training licenses/permits" who have been denied full licensure by the states that issued the training permit -- and no, none of them were denied due to convictions/disciplines or anything related to residency.

Of course you can be fully licensed before finishing residency. Most states will license USMG after internship, and IMG"s after two years. I had my full California license when I was still in residency. Some states even require full licensure to go beyond a certain PGY level. And yes, many physicians hold licenses in states they do not practice in. I do. And some (not all) specialty boards make permenent licensure a requirement for board certification. Some residency programs require licensure for promotion into upper level.

And yes, Teratos is right, some specialty boards do not require permenent licensure to sit for the board exam or become board-certified. So it is possible to be board certified, but yet not licensible in any state.

The point of this thread is that this PGY-5 SC grad has reportedly been in the licensure process (as he himself stated) as early as 2003-2004, and has yet to achieve a licensure in any state. It makes you wonder what kind of problems he has encountered.

P

Tiza
04-08-2006, 02:22 PM
Mercer University in Macon, GA has a St. Christopher doc, either PGY-2 or 3 in IM, so there are a few SC grads in the system.. what happens when they try to move around will be another story.

Scott1981
04-08-2006, 03:20 PM
im still trying to figure out why he ever had a training license in ohio. he never did residency in ohio. mdparadise (i know.... tainted source) claims that he is now doing research in cleveland clinic. im sure that will be the excuse given by some for no license :roll:.

i just cant understand how somebody can dump so much money into an offshore education with private loans, then go on to do a five year surgery residiency, and willingly not practice medicine.

the obvious reason would be licensure problems.
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ps-- really interesting site here. it has links to all the med license searches for each state board. http://healthguideusa.org/medical_license_lookup.htm

microphage
04-08-2006, 06:59 PM
im still trying to figure out why he ever had a training license in ohio. he never did residency in ohio. mdparadise (i know.... tainted source) claims that he is now doing research in cleveland clinic. im sure that will be the excuse given by some for no license :roll:.

i just cant understand how somebody can dump so much money into an offshore education with private loans, then go on to do a five year surgery residiency, and willingly not practice medicine.

the obvious reason would be licensure problems.
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ps-- really interesting site here. it has links to all the med license searches for each state board. http://healthguideusa.org/medical_license_lookup.htm

One also has to wonder why you're not contributing to the AUC forum.... :mad:



;)

Scott1981
04-08-2006, 07:30 PM
One also has to wonder why you're not contributing to the AUC forum.... :mad:



;)

i always lurk the golden palace forums. whatcha talking about? :lol:







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