Sponsored Links
Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 59
Like Tree15Likes

Thread: Caribbean medical schools are NO LONGER a viable option to becoming an MD.

  1. #1
    TomG is offline Junior Member 514 points
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    82
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Caribbean medical schools are NO LONGER a viable option to becoming an MD.

    Consider this another warning to all prospective students, especially non-American citizens, on the incredible dangers of attending offshore medical schools.

    I remember myself, 4 years ago, researching AUC as a recent University of Toronto Honors Bachelor of Science grad with a double major in Neuroscience and Psychology. I would look at this forum, other success stories, even other doctors in my hometown that were practicing pediatricians and family doctors that had also attended AUC.

    Everyone told me the same story... just get into a medical school. For a time that mentality seemed to work for most offshore students hoping to become physicians. Unfortunately given the current climate of residency and match, that is no longer true.

    I attended AUC as a naive Canadian, fresh out of undergrad and eager to become the best doctor in the world. I started off very strong as a student and even made Deans list TWICE, became a tutor for multiple courses and was even admitted into the Honor and Services society. I worked harder than I had my entire life and felt as though it was my destiny to become a great doctor. I was even naive enough to believe I would be able to return to Canada and practice medicine back home near my family and friends. I attended all of the seminars on how to best prepare for boards, extracurricular activities, honor clerkships etc. and felt as though I had it all figured out.

    In retrospect I was being mislead by my own ignorance and willful blindness at the competitiveness of securing a residency that was increasing with every passing year... that would culminate on the year I would graduate in 2015. The school was excellent at hiding these facts from their student body, opting to inspire blind hope rather than reality into its students, ESPECIALLY THE CANADIANS.

    After passing my final NBME exam and leaving the island to return home to write my Step 1, I felt a sense of relief that I was moving on from theory to practical knowledge and would not only crush my step 1 exam, but also be one of the best students during clerkships. Given my incredibly strong achievments at AUC basic sciences, I thought that Step 1 would be a walk in the park. Unfortunately for me, I failed to realize that Step 1 was not only a knowledge exam that had material NEVER even taught at AUC, but was also a 9 hour endurance exam. AUC never prepared its students on how to best approach questions, take breaks, or traps to avoid on the exam. AUC's ONLY goal was to teach students JUST ENOUGH TO PASS. Walking into the exam in Toronto, I was sure I was going to do extremely well on Step 1, oh boy was I wrong. At exactly block 4 (4 hours into the exam), my ability to read and answer questions began to plummet. I was never the kind of student to take breaks during exams and opted usually to plow through the tests as opposed to doing them in short bursts. AUC tested its students every 2 weeks in 4 hour blocks. I was already at the breaking point doing these exams but managed to do well regardless. It was then I realized that I did not have the stamina and endurance to complete the exam at the best of my ability. I began to fall behind block after block and eventually all students, yes EVEN YOU, start to give up and just want the test to end.

    I left the exam room shocked, and extremely tired. I hadn't finished 2 blocks and had to rush every block after hour 4 because I couldn't keep pace. It was a disaster and I felt cheated out of a good score because of my poor endurance.

    After receiving my incredibly sub-par step 1 score of 214, I felt like a massive failure. Step scores are THE MOST IMPORTANT thing in securing a residency, if you score low you are risking not matching at all. It was my dream and passion to become a pediatrician and when I saw that number, my dreams evaporated. So I decided that I would settle with family medicine since that is a less competitive specialty, thus began my clerkships.

    I started my first core clerkship at Bronx Leb hospital in Oby Gyn. I was living in a rat infested apartment, in a very dangerous neighbourhood, and was only comfortable once I had arrived at the hospital. I was an extremely involved student, delivered over 14 babies, assisted with 2 C sections as a first assistant, and NEVER was late or missed a day. Even when my other fellow students would come in late for overnight shift in the obstetrics ward, I would always be there for the the full 14 hour shift. Everyone told me I worked too hard, but I knew that hard work pays off. I honored the course and felt proud of myself.... however I learned that my fellow classmates, who would even skip work days, ALSO honored the rotation. I felt cheated. After all of the hard work I put into the rotation, everyone else got honors just like me.

    I swallowed this truth and told myself that at least I was being honest.

    My work ethic carried through my cores at NUMC in pediatrics, and this time my classmates decided to sabotage me by talking about me behind my back to fellow residents and attendings. Fortunately one of the residents informed me of this and I became much more wary of how cuthroat and devious other medical students can be. I even was able to secure a letter of recommendation.

    I then went to the UK, in Slough, which was an underserved area outside of london. I completed IM, Surgery, and Psychiatry and all of the attendings loved me there. While the other students were all travelling Europe, I was actually at work. I was invovled, I cared about my job and tried to impress everyone. I secured another letter of recommendation, even saved a few lives while I was at it. I also did some extracurricular work outside of work hours delivering more kids via C-section in the obstetrics unit.

    I then did a family medicine rotation back in NYC bronx, loved the clinic and convinced myself that maybe this was my destiny. I was given my own clinic room, gave lectures to patients in the waiting room on assortments of diseases, and secured another LOR.

    It was time to go home to write step 2 CK.

    Now I want all of you readers to understand something very important here, once you leave St. Maarten after having completed basic sciences, you will NEVER hear from the school again. They don't give us tips, they don't teach, they give you NO GUIDANCE whatsoever on how to do well on step 2 ck. In fact, step 2 CK is usually an exam that most AMG's do better in that step 1, because they are not only getting hands on experience but also LESSONS FROM THEIR SCHOOL during clerkships. AUC students get nothing. It is basically a self taught thing. I asked every student what the best source material was to study from and the consensus was that NO SINGLE BOOK is best at preparing for step 2 ck. Everyone says, "just do U world and you'll be fine." Ya Uworld is fine if you have lessons in school to go along with it you lucky AMG. I decided to take a DIT course to help me prepare for Step 2 CK, boy was that a mistake.

    I passed the mandatory NBME Step 2 COMP first time, was given my certificate and I wrote the exam along with my Canadian MCCEE... the outcome was my worst nightmare realized. I had passed the MCCEE just fine, but then I was given the news I had failed step 2 ck by 2 points with a 207. Passing score for step 2 was recently increased from 180-190 to now being a 209 in 2014.

    I was crushed. Failures in the steps are a death sentence. I wanted to quit then and there but my parents pushed me to graduate, saying I had gone through so much to give up now since I was so close.

    I pushed on, completing the remaining of my electives with honors, and secured 5 more letters of recommendations. I then went to florida to complete a course on step 2 ck exam, passed the test with a 220 and graduated. Step 2 CS was also done at the same time, passed it no problem first try.

    September came along. It was application season and everyone was excited. I had done all of my boards and all that remained was interviews and match.

    Letters were in, personal statements done, MSPE etc all in on the very first day of applications. I applied to all 200 programs in family medicine offering J1 visas to prospective residents. Within the first month I got an email invitation for an interview in family medicine, and I thought to myself that maybe I would be lucky after all. Then October came, then November, then December... I asked my fellow Canadians and even AUC students and they all admitted they had only secured 0-2 interviews even in late December...

    I began to panic big time.

    I emailed programs, updated my transcripts etc but nobody was asking me for interviews. I called AUC and they told me that I needed to be patient.

    January came. I went to my interview and immediately felt as though I was not a strong candidate for the residency program as my interviewers did not seem impressed with me. I even asked the other candidates, who were also CANADIAN, how many interviews they had this season, they all replied.. ONE. THE ONLY PERSON in our group that had more was an American girl from AUA that had 11 interviews so far with TWO FAILURES on her boards.

    It was then I realized the truth... being an non-US citizen IMG is a disaster waiting to happen.

    Now here I am, after match week with NO OFFERS and NO JOB.. having amassed MASSIVE debt and the banks are coming for my family and the house.

    Why did this happen? I then began to perform a post mortem on my medical school career. I came upon an article which I feel ALL prospective caribbean students should read, especially Canadians, on how the residency spots are these days: No More IMGs for Residency Training Programs After 2015, Says Journal of American Medical Association | Medicalopedia

    Basically, the higher demand for doctors has inspired medical schools to INCREASE enrollment into their schools BUT residency spots have remained unchanged. NOW we have a match climate that even has UNMATCHED AMG's!!!

    If you are to take a lesson from this then it is this, DO NOT GO TO A MEDICAL SCHOOL OUTSIDE OF YOUR COUNTRY. All you will accrue is debt, and a useless MD title that is worth absolutely NOTHING in the work world.

    If you don't get into a medical school in your home country, keep applying, then apply some more. If you still don't get it, apply again. Eventually you will realize that medicine is not for you and you'll find another career that will lead you to a life that would be better off than if you had attended an offshore medical school.

    There is no reason to go to caribbean medical schools anymore, that path has been closed off thanks to the US medical schools and DO programs. And to all of you hoping to match into Canada, it is even WORSE to get into to a residency up here than down in the states. Nobody wants IMG's anymore.

  2. #11
    Doc's Avatar
    Doc
    Doc is offline Administrator 9367 points
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    11,610
    Downloads
    98
    Uploads
    0
    Blog Entries
    10
    Images
    74
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Advertisements



    TomG:

    I'm so sorry about your situation, but I wouldn't give up if I were you. Furthermore, I don't think it's quite as bad as you're perceiving it to be, albeit it is slowly getting worse each year.

    As per the NRMP as quoted by Medscape News, "of 6638 graduates of international medical schools outside of Canada who filled first-year [primary care] residency positions in 2016, 43% were US citizens and 57% were non-US citizens." For perspective, that is 6638 IMGs compared to 7,160 USMGs for primary care (FM, IM, Peds, IM-Peds) if I'm reading it correctly. You can see the article I posted at http://www.valuemd.com/residency-mat...ow-upward.html

    Another thing to note from the NMRP is that the 2016 match rates for both USIMGs (53.9%) and non-U.S. citizen IMGs (50.5%) increased by about 1% even though they both had a record number of applicants.

    Having been though this on both ends, I can tell you, off the record, that it is not as much about what you know as who you know. Case in point: when on clinical rotations as a med student back in the day, I wasn't always the smartest or hardest working student, but I was almost always the one who got the top evaluations and the best LORs. How? I'm a people-person in real life, and I used the time I had to get to know the Attendings on a personal basis (talking about things besides medicine). In fact, I'd make them laugh, even the grumpiest of surgeons . As a result, those Attendings were readily available to put in a good word for me when the time came, some even willing to make personal phone calls to the Program Directors (PD). Needless to say, if you do that and apply to a program at the same hospital you did your rotations, even better, but I chose to apply elsewhere and it still helped a lot.

    This is not to say that having a stellar CV is not important, because it is since most programs have a screening process before it even gets reviewed by a PD for consideration. But it's not the only important thing. If you asked most primary care PDs if they prefer having an excellent book-smart candidate with an average bedside manner (personality), or an average book-smart person with an excellent bedside manner (personality), you'd be surprised at the answer (assuming they're off the record). That's the whole reason why the "pre-med" undergrad degree has all but disappeared and U.S. med schools are now preferring students with non-science backgrounds (they figure science geeks like me are too uptight ).

    A non-medical, real-life analogy is Terrell Owens (TO), the mega-talented NFL wide receiver who eventually nobody wanted on their teams because of his personality. On paper, he looked incredible. But in real life, the drama wasn't worth his awesome talent, so he was jobless.

    I'm not saying you're like TO or anything close to that, so please don't misunderstand me. My point is that a CV is only the starting point of the match process. It is up to the individual to make themselves standout beyond the info available on the CV. Perhaps reconsider your Personal Statement, so that it is so intriguing to the reader that they must follow up with you. If it's just like other applicants', then you already lost because IMG's are already at a disadvantage. Be positive and help them learn how you would make their program better with your presence and why they must have you there! A hint is that it's not about your intelligence since everyone that applies is intelligent....it's about what sets you apart from all the other smart candidates. Bottom line: Don't give up just yet!

    Best of luck in achieving your dreams!
    Paleo2015 likes this.
    Doc
    Site Administrator

  3. #12
    TomG is offline Junior Member 514 points
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    82
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Doc View Post
    TomG:

    I'm so sorry about your situation, but I wouldn't give up if I were you. Furthermore, I don't think it's quite as bad as you're perceiving it to be, albeit it is slowly getting worse each year.

    As per the NRMP as quoted by Medscape News, "of 6638 graduates of international medical schools outside of Canada who filled first-year [primary care] residency positions in 2016, 43% were US citizens and 57% were non-US citizens." For perspective, that is 6638 IMGs compared to 7,160 USMGs for primary care (FM, IM, Peds, IM-Peds) if I'm reading it correctly. You can see the article I posted at http://www.valuemd.com/residency-mat...ow-upward.html

    Another thing to note from the NMRP is that the 2016 match rates for both USIMGs (53.9%) and non-U.S. citizen IMGs (50.5%) increased by about 1% even though they both had a record number of applicants.

    Having been though this on both ends, I can tell you, off the record, that it is not as much about what you know as who you know. Case in point: when on clinical rotations as a med student back in the day, I wasn't always the smartest or hardest working student, but I was almost always the one who got the top evaluations and the best LORs. How? I'm a people-person in real life, and I used the time I had to get to know the Attendings on a personal basis (talking about things besides medicine). In fact, I'd make them laugh, even the grumpiest of surgeons . As a result, those Attendings were readily available to put in a good word for me when the time came, some even willing to make personal phone calls to the Program Directors (PD). Needless to say, if you do that and apply to a program at the same hospital you did your rotations, even better, but I chose to apply elsewhere and it still helped a lot.

    This is not to say that having a stellar CV is not important, because it is since most programs have a screening process before it even gets reviewed by a PD for consideration. But it's not the only important thing. If you asked most primary care PDs if they prefer having an excellent book-smart candidate with an average bedside manner (personality), or an average book-smart person with an excellent bedside manner (personality), you'd be surprised at the answer (assuming they're off the record). That's the whole reason why the "pre-med" undergrad degree has all but disappeared and U.S. med schools are now preferring students with non-science backgrounds (they figure science geeks like me are too uptight ).

    A non-medical, real-life analogy is Terrell Owens (TO), the mega-talented NFL wide receiver who eventually nobody wanted on their teams because of his personality. On paper, he looked incredible. But in real life, the drama wasn't worth his awesome talent, so he was jobless.

    I'm not saying you're like TO or anything close to that, so please don't misunderstand me. My point is that a CV is only the starting point of the match process. It is up to the individual to make themselves standout beyond the info available on the CV. Perhaps reconsider your Personal Statement, so that it is so intriguing to the reader that they must follow up with you. If it's just like other applicants', then you already lost because IMG's are already at a disadvantage. Be positive and help them learn how you would make their program better with your presence and why they must have you there! A hint is that it's not about your intelligence since everyone that applies is intelligent....it's about what sets you apart from all the other smart candidates. Bottom line: Don't give up just yet!

    Best of luck in achieving your dreams!
    I absolutely agree with you but I WAS that kind of EXCELLENT bedside manner medical student! Patients would REQUEST me in clinic and I even got 3 LOR FROM PATIENTS (albeit I couldn't use them for my application) because they liked me so much as a healthcare provider. I would HELP NURSES with patients EVERY day doing blood draws, giving chemo, even cleaning BEDS. I was an extremely helpful and useful student that loved to work with everyone. EVEN the surgeons loved me because I was ALWAYS hands on and involved (and they knew I didn't plan on becoming a surgeon) they even came to me outside of the OR to have me as FIRST assistant with them because the fellows or residents were away. I was a very stand out student which is why I have over 8 letters of recommendation.

    Another big issue is that unfortunately for me, I didn't rotate at 250+ programs so my admissions committee has no idea what I am like as a medical doctor to my patients or staff. Now that I am back home in Canada I can't expose my practice habits to american doctors due to visa issues etc.

    What's frustrating is that I did my best during clerkships to compensate for my boards but it wasn't enough. I went to work EARLY everyday and came home LATE everyday. I even came in on weekends!

    Did I get along with ALL of the floors staff? Of course not, people thought I was too much of a 'yes man' and that I would show up other students. My classmates HATED my work ethic because I made them work harder than they normally would have just to look like competent students. They would actively withhold things from me just to make me look bad. It was disgusting how competitive and devious these people were, but I told myself that in the end they'll eventually get caught and exposed for what they really are like. I NEVER took anyone elses patients nor did I ever make people look bad in front of attendings (like residents, fellows or students). It's just unfair.

  4. #13
    axiomofchoice is offline Senior Member 6116 points
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    705
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    It's hard to correctly judge how you are perceived by your residents/staff/co-students etc. Everyone seems to think they are loved and hardworking...

    The underlying reason why you didn't match is your performance of boards. You barely passed Step 1 and failed Step 2CK. Grades in your classes at a caribbean medical school don't matter at all. Clerkship grades are pretty meaningless too since, as you noted, grades are randomly assigned mostly honors. The people writing your references are likely not known to their readers, so those don't matter either.

    I only know a single person who didn't match in my class: they failed a step and had behavioral issues resulting in reprimands.

    You should never have attempted step 2 without an expected score >230.
    The "lucky AMG" you speak of are superior students (the reason they are in US MD programs) and I assure you, are not spoon fed board prep like you were in the caribbean.

    Take responsibility. Find a program, infiltrate it however you can (research/volunteering) and try to secure a spot. All hope is not lost

  5. #14
    TomG is offline Junior Member 514 points
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    82
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by axiomofchoice View Post
    It's hard to correctly judge how you are perceived by your residents/staff/co-students etc. Everyone seems to think they are loved and hardworking...

    The underlying reason why you didn't match is your performance of boards. You barely passed Step 1 and failed Step 2CK. Grades in your classes at a caribbean medical school don't matter at all. Clerkship grades are pretty meaningless too since, as you noted, grades are randomly assigned mostly honors. The people writing your references are likely not known to their readers, so those don't matter either.

    I only know a single person who didn't match in my class: they failed a step and had behavioral issues resulting in reprimands.

    You should never have attempted step 2 without an expected score >230.
    The "lucky AMG" you speak of are superior students (the reason they are in US MD programs) and I assure you, are not spoon fed board prep like you were in the caribbean.

    Take responsibility. Find a program, infiltrate it however you can (research/volunteering) and try to secure a spot. All hope is not lost
    Oh I'm not placing the blame on anyone but myself but to be honest, a little more guidance would have gone a long way after leaving the island. I should never have gone to medical school in the first place, that much I know is true. I wanted to quit after step 1 but everyone told me to never give up, after ck I wanted to quit again but people told me to never give up. Even now everyone is telling me not to give up, how can I continue when I have such a terrible relationship with medicine? People love to do what they are good at and I'm not good at this stuff. The post I had was not a rant but a warning to all students thinking of doing medicine in the Caribbean. I don't care about what happens to me anymore, I just don't want people to get sucked into the false hope that they'll become a doctor if they go offshore. I didn't know how I was going to do on my boards when I started school.

    FYI a pass was for step 1 was 180 when I wrote it, now it's 192.

  6. #15
    Paleo2015's Avatar
    Paleo2015 is offline Junior Member 518 points
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    88
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Doc View Post
    TomG:

    I'm so sorry about your situation, but I wouldn't give up if I were you. Furthermore, I don't think it's quite as bad as you're perceiving it to be, albeit it is slowly getting worse each year.

    As per the NRMP as quoted by Medscape News, "of 6638 graduates of international medical schools outside of Canada who filled first-year [primary care] residency positions in 2016, 43% were US citizens and 57% were non-US citizens." For perspective, that is 6638 IMGs compared to 7,160 USMGs for primary care (FM, IM, Peds, IM-Peds) if I'm reading it correctly. You can see the article I posted at http://www.valuemd.com/residency-mat...ow-upward.html

    Another thing to note from the NMRP is that the 2016 match rates for both USIMGs (53.9%) and non-U.S. citizen IMGs (50.5%) increased by about 1% even though they both had a record number of applicants.

    Having been though this on both ends, I can tell you, off the record, that it is not as much about what you know as who you know. Case in point: when on clinical rotations as a med student back in the day, I wasn't always the smartest or hardest working student, but I was almost always the one who got the top evaluations and the best LORs. How? I'm a people-person in real life, and I used the time I had to get to know the Attendings on a personal basis (talking about things besides medicine). In fact, I'd make them laugh, even the grumpiest of surgeons . As a result, those Attendings were readily available to put in a good word for me when the time came, some even willing to make personal phone calls to the Program Directors (PD). Needless to say, if you do that and apply to a program at the same hospital you did your rotations, even better, but I chose to apply elsewhere and it still helped a lot.

    This is not to say that having a stellar CV is not important, because it is since most programs have a screening process before it even gets reviewed by a PD for consideration. But it's not the only important thing. If you asked most primary care PDs if they prefer having an excellent book-smart candidate with an average bedside manner (personality), or an average book-smart person with an excellent bedside manner (personality), you'd be surprised at the answer (assuming they're off the record). That's the whole reason why the "pre-med" undergrad degree has all but disappeared and U.S. med schools are now preferring students with non-science backgrounds (they figure science geeks like me are too uptight ).

    A non-medical, real-life analogy is Terrell Owens (TO), the mega-talented NFL wide receiver who eventually nobody wanted on their teams because of his personality. On paper, he looked incredible. But in real life, the drama wasn't worth his awesome talent, so he was jobless.

    I'm not saying you're like TO or anything close to that, so please don't misunderstand me. My point is that a CV is only the starting point of the match process. It is up to the individual to make themselves standout beyond the info available on the CV. Perhaps reconsider your Personal Statement, so that it is so intriguing to the reader that they must follow up with you. If it's just like other applicants', then you already lost because IMG's are already at a disadvantage. Be positive and help them learn how you would make their program better with your presence and why they must have you there! A hint is that it's not about your intelligence since everyone that applies is intelligent....it's about what sets you apart from all the other smart candidates. Bottom line: Don't give up just yet!

    Best of luck in achieving your dreams!
    very useful post,thanks !
    Ross student and I Matched !!!!

  7. #16
    ctang is offline Junior Member 514 points
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    35
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    TomG,

    If you believe your problem is the citizenship issue, there may be a simple and relatively quick solution. The US Army as a program for non-citizen IMGs. It is a medical reserve program that asks you to serve in non-MD medical assistant positions in a field of your choice and in return gives you a US citizenship within a few months. It allows you to keep your fulltime regular job, requiring just 1 weekend a month of training. I believe it may pay some salary.

    A second option if your family has money is to create a residency spot for yourself. It is a false assumption that the number of residency spot is set by the government. Yes, Medicare sets the number of spots it will fund. And some fields like neurosurgery and dermatology set the number of approved residency slots. But internal medicine does not have a limit. There are hospitals that would be glad to have more house staff if they don't have to pay for it. Residents get sick or become pregnant. The program just have to request an increase from the ACGME which will generally approve the increase if it can be shown that the residency program can meet the educationally requirement. What you have to do is to make a "restricted" charitable donation in the amount equal to your salary and benefits. Not sure if one can get away with writing that off as a tax benefit. It is comparable to a year of medical school tuition. But the money is put to much better use and to a deserving individual. Most programs would probably not want to bother, but some may.

    A third option if you have already completed a residency in another country is to do a fellowship first. Once you completed your fellowship in the US, it becomes infinitely easier to get into a residency. The reason this backdoor approach is possible is that there are more fellowship openings than applicants. This opportunity may exist only for certain fellowships.

    I know how hopeless and angry your must feel. The problem is not AUC per se, but the way Caribbean schools are forced to outsource clinical training to various hospitals. There is not as much incentive for the clinical sites to teach the step 2 material compared to hospitals where the primary role of faculty is to teach their students. Despite this fundamental handicap, AUC has given thousands the opportunity that they would otherwise not have been possible.

    Good luck. It doesn't matter how many failures you may have had. All that it matters is the last success. so don't give up.

  8. #17
    devildoc8404's Avatar
    devildoc8404 is offline Ultimate Member 12699 points
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Confoederatio Helvetica
    Posts
    5,146
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by ctang View Post
    If you believe your problem is the citizenship issue, there may be a simple and relatively quick solution. The US Army as a program for non-citizen IMGs. It is a medical reserve program that asks you to serve in non-MD medical assistant positions in a field of your choice and in return gives you a US citizenship within a few months. It allows you to keep your fulltime regular job, requiring just 1 weekend a month of training. I believe it may pay some salary.
    The Army's MAVNI is a great program, but it is for non-citizen FMGs who have already matched and are completing residency in the States. Program selectees enlist in the Army after completing residency for approximately 3-6 months while their citizenship paperwork is processed, officially become US citizens, and then receive a commission as a Medical Corps officer (Captain O-3). It is, unfortunately, not a pathway for non-citizen FMGs who have not matched.

    Ask the Experts: Military Accessions Vital to the National Interest (MAVNI) ? ECHO Resources
    Paleo2015 likes this.

    "When I haven't any
    blue... I use red
    ."
    - Pablo Picasso

    BA - Oregon ° MS - BYU ° MD - MU-Sofia
    Clinical Research Fellow / Resident
    Fleet Marine Force Hospital Corpsman 1996-2003


  9. #18
    ctang is offline Junior Member 514 points
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    35
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I am talking about a different program. This is not for a physician level position, but for a medical assistant position. I know it exists because I have an IMG in my lab who did not match last year who is in this program and will become a US citizen shortly. I will ask him the specifics when he is back the end of the month.

    btw, since he did not match this year either he decided to accept a fellowship in a neurology subspecality and will apply for residency after completing his fellowship. I think he will have no problem at that time because he will be both a US citizen and have the all important "American clinical experience".
    devildoc8404 likes this.

  10. #19
    devildoc8404's Avatar
    devildoc8404 is offline Ultimate Member 12699 points
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Confoederatio Helvetica
    Posts
    5,146
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Oh, cool! Sounds like a good program for people who need citizenship. Is this guy doing a research fellowship, I presume? That is a solid plan -- upon reapplication he will have citizenship, research experience, US letters, and military experience. Not too shabby for a part-time job. Thanks for clarifying.

    The MAVNI program is great, too, but for different reasons (people who matched in the US and want to stay and get citizenship). Nice to see the military stepping up in this capacity...

    Quote Originally Posted by ctang View Post
    I am talking about a different program. This is not for a physician level position, but for a medical assistant position. I know it exists because I have an IMG in my lab who did not match last year who is in this program and will become a US citizen shortly. I will ask him the specifics when he is back the end of the month.

    btw, since he did not match this year either he decided to accept a fellowship in a neurology subspecality and will apply for residency after completing his fellowship. I think he will have no problem at that time because he will be both a US citizen and have the all important "American clinical experience".

    "When I haven't any
    blue... I use red
    ."
    - Pablo Picasso

    BA - Oregon ° MS - BYU ° MD - MU-Sofia
    Clinical Research Fellow / Resident
    Fleet Marine Force Hospital Corpsman 1996-2003


  11. #20
    ctang is offline Junior Member 514 points
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    35
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    The fellowship option before doing a US residency is typically clinical. The most recent faculty who joined our department had graduated from a German medical school and completed his residency in Germany. He did a one year clinical/research fellowship in movement disorder at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Then he re did his internship and residency to satisfy US licensing rules. Then he become faculty directly from residency. The FMG who is currently in my lab will be doing a 100% clinical fellowship.

    With respect to my first two suggestions for TomG: (1) The military needs people with medical knowledge to fill non-physician positions and there are lots of FMGs who needs US citizenship. (2) Taking the initiative to create additional residency spots for yourself is not a simple route, but not a crazy idea. Many program directors are aware of it but would never publicize it. They have to balance the risk to the programs reputation/selectivity vs decreased stress to their overworked residents. My suspicion is that big programs in inner cities that are less concerned about their reputation may be ones to make enquiries. Perhaps just ask for a PGY1 spot. Once you have completed a PGY1 in IM, there are lots of ads from programs who have just kicked out a resident or who became ill. They will take almost anyone at that point who could walk in as a PGY2.
    Paleo2015 likes this.

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Is Servicio Social No longer an Option for the International Students
    By mu_devils1 in forum Universidad Autonoma de Guadalajara (UAG)
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 12-22-2011, 12:32 AM
  2. Dismissed from SABA, are any other schools viable options?
    By handlelight in forum Main Foreign Medical Schools Forum
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: 05-20-2011, 08:41 AM
  3. Re “New York Medical Schools Fight to End Caribbean Schools’ Path”
    By Buckeyes1970 in forum American University of the Caribbean (AUC)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-05-2011, 11:40 PM
  4. Caribbean Medical schools vs European Med schools?
    By tml.chelseafc in forum Main Foreign Medical Schools Forum
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-13-2010, 02:06 PM
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-13-2007, 11:19 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •