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Veterinarian Description
Veterinary Medicine

VETERINARIAN - DESCRIPTION

A veterinary physician, colloquially called a vet, shortened from veterinarian (American English, Australian English) or veterinary surgeon (British English), is a professional who practices veterinary medicine by treating disease, disorder, and injury in non-human animals.

In many countries, the local nomenclature for a vet is a regulated and protected term, meaning that members of the public without the prerequisite qualifications and/or registration are not able to use the title. In many cases, the activities that may be undertaken by a veterinarian (such as animal treatment or surgery) are restricted only to those professionals who are registered as vet. For instance, in the United Kingdom, as in other jurisdictions, animal treatment may only be performed by registered vets (with a few designated exceptions, such as paraveterinary workers), and it is illegal for any person who is not registered to call themselves a vet or perform any treatment.

Most vets work in clinical settings, treating animals directly. These vets may be involved in a general practice, treating animals of all types; may be specialized in a specific group of animals such as companion animals, livestock, zoo animals or horses; or may specialize in a narrow medical discipline such as surgery, dermatology or internal medicine.

As with healthcare professionals, vets face ethical decisions about the care of their patients. Current debates within the profession include the ethics of purely cosmetic procedures on animals, such as declawing of cats, docking of tails, cropping of ears and debarking on dogs.

Veterinarians - SUMMARY

Quick Facts: Veterinarians
2012 Median Pay $84,460 per year
$40.61 per hour
Entry-Level Education Doctoral or professional degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2012 70,300
Job Outlook, 2012-22 12% (As fast as average)
Employment Change, 2012-22 8,400
Veterinarians check for symptoms of illnesses in pets
Veterinarians check for symptoms of illnesses in pets.

What Veterinarians Do

Veterinarians care for the health of animals and work to improve public health. They diagnose, treat, and research medical conditions and diseases of pets, livestock, and other animals.

Work Environment

Although most veterinarians work in private clinics and hospitals, others travel to farms, work in laboratories or classrooms, or work for the government.

How to Become a Veterinarian

Veterinarians must have a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from an accredited veterinary college and a state license.

Pay

The median annual wage for veterinarians was $84,460 in May 2012.

Job Outlook

Employment of veterinarians is projected to grow 12 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Candidates can expect very strong competition for available veterinarian positions. Those with specializations and prior work experience should have the best job opportunities.

Last Modification: 01-26-2014
Source:
http://www.bls.gov