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  1. #1
    stjones is offline Newbie 510 points
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    How can I become more reputable?

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    (I am new to this forum so I apologize if this sounds redundant, I have read a few previous posts though.)

    I just graduated w/ a bachelors degree in Biology (minor in Chem). However, my grades were not the best. I don't know my guaranteed science GPA but according to Temple University's calculator its a 2.5 (2.578125001 - assuming I did it correctly). My overall GPA was a 3.0 (3.0821) and my last four semesters GPA's were (oldest to newest) 3.04, 3.0, 3.4 and 3.87. However, I had a really bad semester the spring before that (1.8) and there was like another semester of 2's. I feel like my last two years show great effort and resulting improvement. And I was wondering does that count for something?

    I want to apply to Quinnipiac's PA program ultimately, but I know according to their statistics, that it is a very tough process. My 2nd and 3rd choices (UFL and MUSC) requirements are just as rigorous, so I need to make myself more reputable. I am definitely going to apply to a CNA course (possibly as soon as next week Monday- $800), but i'm trying to decide if I want to begin that program or a Medical Assistant Program (that begins the same Monday and costs $24,600). Which route would be more efficient in obtaining a minimum of 2000 hours clinical experience (including simply looking better)?

    I also plan to do volunteer emergency services and will be requesting shadowing of two doctors.

    I have not taken my GRE yet, however, I am confident I will do well because I am generally a good test taker in the non-sciences. Although not the same as the GRE, I took an assessment test for the MA program and (w/ the exception of algebra which was still above average), I scored between a 96-99 on the various sections.

    How do I look now? And what would make me the better applicant?

  2. #2
    azskeptic's Avatar
    azskeptic is offline Moderator 666 points
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    Research nurse practitioner programs. You do a nursing degree and then a masters. They do what PAs do in many ways but have more ability to function independently. There are BA programs that are 14 months long and take someone with a BA to a BA in nursing. Then you go an additional one year to become a NP. Take a look at the program at UNLV in Nevada

    Quote Originally Posted by stjones View Post
    (I am new to this forum so I apologize if this sounds redundant, I have read a few previous posts though.)

    I just graduated w/ a bachelors degree in Biology (minor in Chem). However, my grades were not the best. I don't know my guaranteed science GPA but according to Temple University's calculator its a 2.5 (2.578125001 - assuming I did it correctly). My overall GPA was a 3.0 (3.0821) and my last four semesters GPA's were (oldest to newest) 3.04, 3.0, 3.4 and 3.87. However, I had a really bad semester the spring before that (1.8) and there was like another semester of 2's. I feel like my last two years show great effort and resulting improvement. And I was wondering does that count for something?

    I want to apply to Quinnipiac's PA program ultimately, but I know according to their statistics, that it is a very tough process. My 2nd and 3rd choices (UFL and MUSC) requirements are just as rigorous, so I need to make myself more reputable. I am definitely going to apply to a CNA course (possibly as soon as next week Monday- $800), but i'm trying to decide if I want to begin that program or a Medical Assistant Program (that begins the same Monday and costs $24,600). Which route would be more efficient in obtaining a minimum of 2000 hours clinical experience (including simply looking better)?

    I also plan to do volunteer emergency services and will be requesting shadowing of two doctors.

    I have not taken my GRE yet, however, I am confident I will do well because I am generally a good test taker in the non-sciences. Although not the same as the GRE, I took an assessment test for the MA program and (w/ the exception of algebra which was still above average), I scored between a 96-99 on the various sections.

    How do I look now? And what would make me the better applicant?
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  3. #3
    TriageModerator's Avatar
    TriageModerator is offline Moderator 7161 points
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    I agree with azskeptic, BSN then NP is probably the easiest route. To answer your Medical Assistant vs CNA question, definitely CNA. CNA's generally receive a broader clinical experience. If you like the emergency room setting, you might as well look into EMT certification.

    " You must be the change you wish to see in the world."
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  4. #4
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    hopefuldoc74 is offline Member 539 points
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    But there are fundamental differences between PA/NP training, work and respect levels, to be quite honest with you. Nurses are trained in nursing and report to nursing boards, yet have been pushing for independent medical practice. PA's are trained in medicine to compliment the physician. They are both considered mid-level practitioners.

    What would you be happy doing in the end? Being a nurse or being a PA? I would choose PA.

    Though it cost all you have, get understanding.

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  5. #5
    TriageModerator's Avatar
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    It probably varies depending on state, but over here in Texas, PAs and NPs have similar privileges. Both practice under oversight physicians, both have delegated precriptive privileges, both are listed under the oversight physician's medical board listing. I have seen that PAs go into a variety of specialties while a large number of NPs go into family practice (and then you have your CRNAs).I have heard that the PA curriculum is a bit more intense, but bear in mind that NPs complete BSN programs and have atleast a year of experience working as nurses before going to NP school. I would think that a BSN + MPA is a very good combination. As an NP, you can always get your DNP though. At the end, you are still a mid-level provider. Though there will always be the argument of whether an NP or PA is more competent, an NP or PA can only be number two at the most. The doctor will always be numero uno.

    " You must be the change you wish to see in the world."
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  6. #6
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    Aaliahthomas is offline Junior Member 510 points
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    A nurse performs a range of duties, including recording medical histories, examining patients, providing treatment, and assisting in the administration of diagnostic tests. An NP may also analyze the results of certain tests, operate medical machinery, and administer medications.
    A physician assistant performs many of the same tasks as an NP. However, a PA must work under the supervision of a physician or surgeon and cannot operate an independent practice. PAs can prescribe medications. They can also serve as primary care providers, always under the supervision of a licensed physician.
    Winners never quit and quitters never win.

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