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  1. #1
    wAyRadikull's Avatar
    wAyRadikull is offline Junior Member 510 points
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    Books for clinicals??

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    So what kind of books are you guys reading during each respective rotation? Also how much time do you get to read? I've heard some crazy horror stories about working 60 hrs a week plus reading when you get home haha. Thanks.
    Last edited by wAyRadikull; 10-31-2009 at 08:03 PM.

  2. #2
    amyames's Avatar
    amyames is offline Member 517 points
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    here's

    yes, reading after you finish for the day can be a very hard thing to do...especially when you are so tired from a long day at work. my suggestion is to buy an all purpose book that can fit into your jacket pocket so that when you have down time, you can sneak a look. I liked the Case Files series, yes I could fit it into my jammed pockets, or the Boards and Wards Book.


    For each separate rotation here is what I recommend


    • Medicine

    1. hands down best book is Step Up to Medicine. Buy it! You will use this for your step 2 prep, too.
    2. MKSAP book of questions is also very good but I think overkill for the shelves MUA and SABA have to take. but this book will make you think and it's always good to be doing questions.
    3. able to fit into your pocket: Case Files Internal Medicine. I like how the book is presented in a case presentation format. It makes the book a quick read and something that's great for when you have spare moments on the wards.
    4. Pocket Medicine: Mass General Hospital seen carried on wards all across America. It's great to have when you need to admit patients but I didn't think it was a great study tool. Still, I liked it better than the Washington Manual, but you can take your pick.
    5. Some will say you need to read Harrison's as well. I think it's a fantastic book, but I never had to time to read it. If you do, please read it. You can find PDF versions of the book, if you don't want to buy it just yet.


    • Surgery

    1. Surgical Recall is the best book overall. it's easy to fit into a jacket pocket and most attendings expect that you have recall memorized and are reading a more comprehensive book on top of recall!
    2. For those that like Harrison's for internal medicine, you'll like Bailey and Love textbook of Surgery. I actually read this along with recall even though I didn't have the time... I downloaded a PDF version of it, and so would print off the section of the case I would be in the for day and read it and recall before I scrubbed in.
    3. I also liked Case Files Surgery for when I took the shelf exam because the case presentation format is the way I learn the best.
    4. The appleton and lange review of surgery is a book with 1,ooo questions in it. I think overkill for the shelves, but i learned a lot from these questions for my step prep. I also found this book on PDF>.
    5. My american medical school friends also swear my NMS Surgical Cases but I have not looked at this book, so it's up to you


    • Psychology

    1. Current Clinical Strategies in Psych. You might not find this in a Barnes and Noble ec, but they can order it for you. I liked this series for psych a lot. The book is small and easy to carry in the jacket pocket, and it's also pretty cheap ($15 bucks). It had everything I needed. I didn't use any other book for my rotation.
    2 . Other students swore by First Aid for Psych and I did take a look at the book and I liked it...but I didn't want to spend the money so I just stuck with my current clincal strategies book.
    3. I've also heard High Yield Psych is good.


    • OBGYN

    1. Blueprints OBGYN is the best book in my opinion. It had all the essentials. This was my main book.
    2. I also enjoyed the Current Clinical Strategies for OBGYN. It was easy to carry in the jacket pocket.
    3. On my rotation we were required to purchase the little red book, the OBGYN , Gyn and Infertility book is the name, and that is what all the interns carried as well. I thought it was handy, but for some reason I liked the Current Clinical Strategies better. However, since all the residents carried it, you might want to think about carrying about it...I know for me, if I didn't know something they would say "ugh, didn't you read your redbook today?"


    • PEDS

    1. I used Blueprints Peds. It is the best book in my opinion.

    Basically all the bold red titles are the most useful books for each rotation and the other books listed are just great supplements if you really want to learn the material well.


    OH and yes, for every rotation, I would also try and read the Kaplan Books. The latest 2008-2009 can be found on PDF if you search the net. It's great if you print them out and keep them in your locker. I thought they were excellent.


    As for other go to books: most students will have a Maxwell handy. it has handy lab values and template notes ie postpartum note, ect. Students will also carry a differential diagnosis guide for the first months of a new rotation especially IM and that's fine. just try and wean yourself off the book by the time the rotation ends. there are a bunch of different differential guides to choose from so I would just hit a bookstore and find the best one for you. Or just read the reviews on amazon and then choose.

    as for the shelf exams, your best bet is Exam Master. It is a question bank that the school lets you use for free. It's good prep for the shelf, so don't forget to use it before every shelf exam! trust me on this!


    I hope this helps! please other posters chime in for the books they liked the best.
    Psych Baltimore, MD [x], IM Detroit, MI [x], OBGYN Detroit, MI [x], Surgery Kansas City, MO [x], Peds New York City [x]
    GI MetroHealth [x], Medicine SUB I Metro Health[x], Nephrology Wyckoff Heights Hospital [x], Pulm/Critical Care Wycokff Heights [x], Family Medicine, Research Medical Center, Kansas City MO [x], Anesthesiology wyckoff heights [x], Radiology [x], Pediatric Pulmnology, Children's Mercy, Kansas City, MO [x], step CS [x], step 2 CK [x]

  3. #3
    wAyRadikull's Avatar
    wAyRadikull is offline Junior Member 510 points
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    Thank you so much for such a thorough response. :-)

  4. #4
    SPODAT's Avatar
    SPODAT is offline Senior Member 515 points
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    Diferent strokes

    If you want... here's a different list, for learning while on rotations. I guarantee, if you learn what's here, you'll be an ace at everything. Not that you need to be. I wasn't, I'll guarantee that. You just need to be good enough for the specialty you are choosing.


    *First aid for the wards: Enough for Ob/gyn and for Ped's and Psych, (If you know every word in there, and look up a few extra things in Mass Gen, internet, etc...) and abotu 2/3 of enough for IM and Surgery.
    Mass General Handbook (the red book) for IM
    Surgical Recall: Great book, impossible to learn it all, but great book.
    Whatever your specialty of choice, buy another main textbook for that.

    *Epocrates Full Version (139$): sounds silly, but if you have it on a pda, you can study all kinds of stuff, while between surgeries, watching a tocometer, waddling through IM rounds, in between runny noses in peds, etc. It is evidence based, fully updated, well integrated dx/ddx/drugs, ID, everything. It doesn't cover EVERY weird condition, but it does cover all the stuff you need.

    *First Aid for Step 3 (now on PDA)... AWESOME!!!! anytime. This book lets you see what is really important, how to handle the daily, weekly stuff, not the weird stuff that you never see. It may seem out of place, and you may need to go backward to fill in some blanks, but it's succinct and very useful.

    Again, if you use First Aid for the Wards (all 5 cores, plus) as a starting point, and then add the above, you'll be very well prepared as an MS3.

    Almost forgot, if you use a pda, you can also get Merck Medicus (Merck Manual) for free, it's a seriously amazing refference that spans almost everything. You can also get free derm and other tools from medmeister.com, and they have an amazing "familymedicineconsult" that covers EVERY specialty really well, not 100%, but 100% of the % that you use. There's a bunch of other stuff, and you always have your pda with you, that's nice.

    Taber's medical dictionary is a tool I use all the time, on pda (50$)

    Find what works for you.
    Last edited by SPODAT; 11-08-2009 at 08:09 PM.

  5. #5
    wAyRadikull's Avatar
    wAyRadikull is offline Junior Member 510 points
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    Thanks for the response Spodat.

    Whats the verdict on First Aid Step 2 CK and how it compares to First Aid B&W?

  6. #6
    amyames's Avatar
    amyames is offline Member 517 points
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    good call

    Why I myself didn't like First Aid for the Wards, I think the full version of Epocrates is something I should have invested in!

    I saw a medic friend have the epocrates and boy! It feels like why did I even spend money on medical school? That program has it all!

    is the $139 a student price? and is easy to use for a Blackberry? I hear Epocrates works better on the Iphone, but I'm a crackberry because I heart my push email, so wondered about it for the bb.

    I'll def. check out the First Aid step 3 as well. thanks for the information on that book.

    it's great to hear other opinions because I'm learning about new books, too.
    Psych Baltimore, MD [x], IM Detroit, MI [x], OBGYN Detroit, MI [x], Surgery Kansas City, MO [x], Peds New York City [x]
    GI MetroHealth [x], Medicine SUB I Metro Health[x], Nephrology Wyckoff Heights Hospital [x], Pulm/Critical Care Wycokff Heights [x], Family Medicine, Research Medical Center, Kansas City MO [x], Anesthesiology wyckoff heights [x], Radiology [x], Pediatric Pulmnology, Children's Mercy, Kansas City, MO [x], step CS [x], step 2 CK [x]

  7. #7
    SPODAT's Avatar
    SPODAT is offline Senior Member 515 points
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    Right Amy, I agree.

    WayRad, you're very welcome. As fas as comparing First aid for the Wards with Step2CK, they are very different. One doesn't replace the other. "Wards" gives you a very good birds eye view of each rotation, and many, but not all of the needed learning for the rotation. Step2CK has all of the facts to pass the USMLE Step2 CK. It's far more detailed. Yet, I really did not use CK much after buying it, I used USMLE World Qbank far more, then used Merck manual, Epocrates, and Med5 Path and Clin med slides for studying for step 2 (not to mention Wikipedia ). In my opinion reading CK for the USMLE is a waste of time. Depending on how you like it, maybe it's good study reading for your daily clinical cases, but you can use whatever material you already are used to using (like the above, for me) to read about the cases you have that day, or for surgery, if you can read on what's coming the following day, per your preceptors schedule.

  8. #8
    SPODAT's Avatar
    SPODAT is offline Senior Member 515 points
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    Amy, regarding BlackBerry and Epocrates

    Knowing Epocrates, I'd be very surprised if there was any difference in actual conent or useability between various platforms. I use it on a Pocket PC (pretty similar to Black Berry), so I don't think there's any significant difference in the content you can access, probably minor stylistic differences only. I've seen it work faster on Iphones than on my Ipaq, but no big deal.

    It takes a little time to learn the symptom and the infectious disease tools, but they are worth it. The basic medical text on there, the succinct way it's presented, and crossliked with drugs, ID, DX, is awesome.

  9. #9
    revanth is offline Newbie 510 points
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    how much would you have to spend on books for clinicals, typically per semester? looking for a rough estimate.

    Thanks

  10. #10
    SPODAT's Avatar
    SPODAT is offline Senior Member 515 points
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    My opinion is anywhere from Zero to 100$/rotation, depending upon books you'd like to buy. I would think of these books as ones that will stay with you as refferences for a long time, except for maybe Surgical Recall, unless you are going to be a surgeon, even then, you'd move to a more comprehensive text.

    I've never had an attending say "so where is your textbook". And I always found the pda books, or pocket books were easier to carry around and read in between stuff.

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